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Microbial Interactions

  • J. L. Reissig

Part of the Receptors and Recognition book series (RERE, volume 3)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. Gerald L. Hazelbauer, John S. Parkinson
    Pages 59-98
  3. Mark Achtman, Ron Skurray
    Pages 233-279
  4. Thomas R. Manney, James H. Meade
    Pages 281-321
  5. Ursula W. Goodenough
    Pages 323-350
  6. Jose L. Reissig
    Pages 399-415
  7. Back Matter
    Pages 417-436

About this book

Introduction

Microbiology has undergone a number of metamorphoses in its relatively brief existence. It has been in approximate succession, morphology, epidemiology, biochemistry, genetics, and molecular biology. It is also becoming a significant parcel of cell surface studies. The one embodiment which has remained elusiv- particularly for bacteriology - is the taxonomic one. This may have been a blessing in disguise because it encouraged microbiologists to deal with the general rather than the particular; promoting a search for unitary explanations, in the manner of Kluyver and van Niel, long before anyone knew about the universality of the genetic code, or could trace the genealogy of enzymes from the study of amino acid substitutions. . This volume is predicated on the idea that deep analogies underly the mech­ anisms of cellular interaction, and therefore belongs in the unitary tradition of microbiology. It occupies itself with a wide variety of micro-organisms, considering them from vantage points of considerable diversity, ranging from taxonomic irreverence to keen evolutionary awareness, and is concerned with areas which have developed independently of each other.

Keywords

bacteria epidemiology genetics microbiology molecular biology

Editors and affiliations

  • J. L. Reissig
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biology, C.W. Post CollegeLong Island UniversityUSA

Bibliographic information