Energy

The Conservation Revolution

  • Authors
  • John H. Gibbons
  • William U. Chandler

Part of the Modern Perspectives in Energy book series (MPIE)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xv
  2. Prologue The Conservation Revolution

    1. John H. Gibbons, William U. Chandler
      Pages 1-15
  3. A Short History of the Future

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 17-18
    2. John H. Gibbons, William U. Chandler
      Pages 19-32
    3. John H. Gibbons, William U. Chandler
      Pages 33-48
    4. John H. Gibbons, William U. Chandler
      Pages 49-62
  4. Energy Sourcery

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 63-65
    2. John H. Gibbons, William U. Chandler
      Pages 67-82
    3. John H. Gibbons, William U. Chandler
      Pages 83-101
    4. John H. Gibbons, William U. Chandler
      Pages 103-131
    5. John H. Gibbons, William U. Chandler
      Pages 133-156
  5. The Conservation Well

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 157-158
    2. John H. Gibbons, William U. Chandler
      Pages 159-186
    3. John H. Gibbons, William U. Chandler
      Pages 187-207
    4. John H. Gibbons, William U. Chandler
      Pages 209-233
  6. Epilogue Through the Straits

    1. John H. Gibbons, William U. Chandler
      Pages 235-241
  7. Back Matter
    Pages 243-258

About this book

Introduction

We try in this book to provide a detailed but readable, technical but accessible monograph on energy in the United States. We treat energy as a multidisciplinary challenge and apply the standard tools of economists, physicists, engineers, policy analysts, and, some might claim, fortune tellers. We hope that it will be used in classrooms of various types, and read by the general reader as well. That increased energy efficiency should be the first priority of energy policymakers is a conclusion, not an assumption, of our analysis. Many analysts have arrived at this conclusion while working separately on energy supply problems. The magnitude and scope of supply problems, primarily problems of high prices and environmental costs, lead one inexorably back to reducing demand growth as the first, most important step in any plausible energy future. We examine, in some depth, why much of the past literature on energy still points, fallaciously in our opinion, to high energy c- v Preface vi sumption futures. This is in Part I (called "A Short History of the Future"). We devote one-third of the book (Part II) to energy resources, their internal and external costs, and the quantities of energy to be derived from these resources. This analysis provides a context within which the economic and social value of energy conservation options can be assessed.

Keywords

efficiency energy energy efficiency energy policy environment growth history

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-9209-9
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1981
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4615-9211-2
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4615-9209-9
  • About this book