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Metabolic Turnover in the Nervous System

  • D. A. Rappoport
  • R. R. Fritz
  • S. Yamagami
  • Robert L. Herrmann
  • A. V. Palladin
  • N. M. Poljakova
  • Isaac Schenkein
  • Louis Sokoloff
  • A. Lajtha
  • N. Marks
  • J. R. Smythies
  • William A. Brodsky
  • Adil E. Shamoo
  • Irving L. Schwartz
  • H. R. Wyssbrod
  • W. N. Scott
  • W. A. Brodsky
  • I. L. Schwartz
Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xxi
  2. D. A. Rappoport, R. R. Fritz, S. Yamagami
    Pages 439-479
  3. Robert L. Herrmann
    Pages 481-487
  4. A. V. Palladin, N. M. Poljakova
    Pages 489-501
  5. Isaac Schenkein
    Pages 503-524
  6. Louis Sokoloff
    Pages 525-549
  7. A. Lajtha, N. Marks
    Pages 551-629
  8. William A. Brodsky, Adil E. Shamoo, Irving L. Schwartz
    Pages 645-681
  9. H. R. Wyssbrod, W. N. Scott, W. A. Brodsky, I. L. Schwartz
    Pages 683-819
  10. Back Matter
    Pages 821-837

About this book

Introduction

Volume V deals with the problems of turnover in the nervous system. "Turnover" is defined in different ways, and the term is used in different contexts. It is used rather broadly in the present volume, and intentionally so. The turnover of macromolecules is only one aspect; here "turnover" in­ dicates the simultaneous and coordinated formation and breakdown of macromolecular species. The complexities of cerebral protein turnover are shown in aseparate chapter dealing with the synthesis ofproteins, in another on breakdown, and in still another on the relationship ofthese two (showing how the two halves of turnover are controlled). The fact that most likely the two halves of protein turnover, synthesis and breakdown, are separated spatially and the mechanisms involved are different further emphasizes the complexity of macromolecular turnover. "Turnover" is used in a different context when the turnover of a cycle is discussed; but he re again a number of complex metabolic reactions have to be interrelated and controlled; some such cycles are discussed briefly in this volume, additional cycles have been discussed with metabolism, and some cycles still await elucidation or discovery.

Keywords

biology complexity growth media nervous system receptor system

Authors and affiliations

  • D. A. Rappoport
    • 1
  • R. R. Fritz
    • 1
  • S. Yamagami
    • 1
  • Robert L. Herrmann
    • 2
  • A. V. Palladin
    • 3
  • N. M. Poljakova
    • 3
  • Isaac Schenkein
    • 4
  • Louis Sokoloff
    • 5
  • A. Lajtha
    • 6
  • N. Marks
    • 6
  • J. R. Smythies
    • 7
    • 8
  • William A. Brodsky
    • 9
  • Adil E. Shamoo
    • 9
  • Irving L. Schwartz
    • 9
    • 10
  • H. R. Wyssbrod
    • 11
    • 12
    • 10
  • W. N. Scott
    • 11
    • 12
    • 10
  • W. A. Brodsky
    • 11
    • 12
    • 10
  • I. L. Schwartz
    • 11
    • 12
    • 10
  1. 1.Division of Molecular Biology Department of PediatricsThe University of Texas Medical BranchGalvestonUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryBoston University School of MedicineBostonUSA
  3. 3.Institute of Biochemistry of the Ukrainian Academy of SciencesKievU.S.S.R.
  4. 4.Irvington House Institute Department of MedicineNew York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  5. 5.Section on Developmental Neurochemistry Laboratory of Cerebral Metabolism National Institute of Mental HealthU.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare Public Health ServiceBethesdaUSA
  6. 6.New York State Research Institute for Neurochemistry and Drug Addiction Ward’s IslandNew YorkUSA
  7. 7.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of EdinburghUK
  8. 8.Neuroscience ProgramUniversity of AlabamaUSA
  9. 9.Departments of Physiology and BiophysicsMount Sinai Medical and Graduate Schools of the City University of New YorkUSA
  10. 10.the Medical Research CenterBrookhaven National LaboratoryUptonUSA
  11. 11.The Departments of Physiology, Biophysics and OphthalmologyMount Sinai Medical and Graduate Schools of the City University of New YorkNew YorkUSA
  12. 12.The Institute for Medical Research and StudiesNew YorkUSA

Bibliographic information