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Diseases of Wild Waterfowl

  • Gary A. Wobeser

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. Introduction

    1. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 1-12
  3. Viral Infections

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 13-13
    2. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 15-27
    3. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 43-54
  4. Bacterial Infections

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 55-55
    2. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 57-69
    3. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 71-91
  5. Fungal Infections

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 93-93
    2. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 95-103
  6. Parasitic Infections

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 105-105
    2. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 107-117
    3. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 119-128
    4. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 129-146
  7. Toxicoses

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 147-147
    2. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 149-161
    3. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 163-178
    4. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 179-188
    5. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 189-208
  8. Miscellaneous Conditions

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 209-209
    2. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 211-224
  9. Investigative Techniques

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 225-225
    2. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 227-236
    3. Gary A. Wobeser
      Pages 237-250
  10. Back Matter
    Pages 251-324

About this book

Introduction

Management of wild waterfowl has become increasingly intensive. Many birds now hatch in managed nesting cover or in artificial nesting structures, use man-made wetlands, and winter on crowded refuges while consuming a grain diet The water they use is often limited in supply and may contain residues from its many prior users. Unfortunately, intensified management often results in new problems, among which disease is important There are many similarities between the current form of management used for some waterfowl and that used in domestic animals. In both, the objective is to maintain a healthy, productive population. Dealing with health problems in waterfowl will benefit from combining the skills of veterinary medicine and wildlife ecology. Revisiting this book after 15 years allowed me to consider changes at the interface between the two disciplines. Veterinary medicine traditionally has been concerned with the individual and with treating sick animals, while the ecologist is concerned with populations and the manager has limited interest in treating sick birds. During this period there has been a marked increase in awareness among veterinarians that they have a responsibility in wildlife and conservation biology. Curricula of many veterinary colleges now include material on non-domestic animals and attempt to put disease in an ecological context. Also during this time, waterfowl managers have become more aware of disease as a factor in population biology and there are early attempts to put numbers to "disease" in models of continental waterfowl populations.

Keywords

Metazoa Plasma Viruses crops ecology fungal infections infection parasite parasites pesticide preservation protozoa toxin virus waterfowl

Authors and affiliations

  • Gary A. Wobeser
    • 1
  1. 1.Western College of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada

Bibliographic information