Advertisement

Pond Aquaculture Water Quality Management

  • Claude E. Boyd
  • Craig S. Tucker

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xv
  2. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 1-7
  3. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 8-86
  4. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 87-153
  5. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 154-177
  6. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 178-225
  7. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 226-305
  8. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 306-353
  9. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 354-373
  10. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 374-393
  11. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 394-438
  12. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 439-471
  13. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 472-497
  14. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 498-540
  15. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 541-575
  16. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 576-600
  17. Claude E. Boyd, Craig S. Tucker
    Pages 601-624
  18. Back Matter
    Pages 625-700

About this book

Introduction

The efficient and profitable production of fish, crustaceans, and other aquatic organisms in aquaculture depends on a suitable environment in which they can reproduce and grow. Because those organisms live in water, the major environ­ mental concern within the culture system is water quality. Water supplies for aquaculture systems may naturally be oflow quality or polluted by human activity, but in most instances, the primary reason for water quality impairment is the culture activity itself. Manures, fertilizers, and feeds applied to ponds to enhance production only can be partially converted to animal biomass. Thus, at moderate and high production levels, the inputs of nutrients and organic matter to culture units may exceed the assimilative capacity of the ecosystems. The result is deteriorating water quality which stresses the culture species, and stress leads to poor growth, greater incidence of disease, increased mortality, and low produc­ tion. Effluents from aquaculture systems can cause pollution of receiving waters, and pollution entering ponds in source water or chemicals added to ponds for management purposes can contaminate aquacultural products. Thus, water quality in aquaculture extends into the arenas of environmental protection and food quality and safety. A considerable body of literature on water quality management in aquaculture has been accumulated over the past 50 years. The first attempt to compile this information was a small book entitled Water Quality in Warmwater Fish Ponds (Boyd I 979a).

Keywords

algae aquaculture aquatic animals ecology environment environmental protection fish food growth information pollution sustainability

Authors and affiliations

  • Claude E. Boyd
    • 1
  • Craig S. Tucker
    • 2
  1. 1.Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station, Department of Fisheries and Allied AquaculturesAuburn UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Delta Research and Extension CenterMississippi State UniversityStonevilleUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-5407-3
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4613-7469-5
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4615-5407-3
  • Buy this book on publisher's site