Advertisement

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. David S. Seigler
    Pages 1-15
  3. David S. Seigler
    Pages 16-41
  4. David S. Seigler
    Pages 42-50
  5. David S. Seigler
    Pages 51-55
  6. David S. Seigler
    Pages 56-75
  7. David S. Seigler
    Pages 94-105
  8. David S. Seigler
    Pages 106-129
  9. David S. Seigler
    Pages 130-138
  10. David S. Seigler
    Pages 151-192
  11. David S. Seigler
    Pages 193-214
  12. David S. Seigler
    Pages 215-233
  13. David S. Seigler
    Pages 234-246
  14. David S. Seigler
    Pages 247-272
  15. David S. Seigler
    Pages 273-299
  16. David S. Seigler
    Pages 300-311
  17. David S. Seigler
    Pages 312-323
  18. David S. Seigler
    Pages 324-352
  19. David S. Seigler
    Pages 353-366
  20. David S. Seigler
    Pages 367-397
  21. David S. Seigler
    Pages 398-426
  22. David S. Seigler
    Pages 427-455
  23. David S. Seigler
    Pages 456-472
  24. David S. Seigler
    Pages 473-485
  25. David S. Seigler
    Pages 486-505
  26. David S. Seigler
    Pages 506-512
  27. David S. Seigler
    Pages 568-577
  28. David S. Seigler
    Pages 578-616
  29. David S. Seigler
    Pages 628-654
  30. David S. Seigler
    Pages 655-667
  31. David S. Seigler
    Pages 692-711
  32. Back Matter
    Pages 713-759

About this book

Introduction

Life has evolved as a unified system; no organism exists similar role also has been suggested for fatty acids from alone, but each is in intimate contact with other organisms cyanolipids. Nonprotein amino acids, cyanogenic glyco­ and its environment. Historically, it was easier for workers sides, and the non-fatty-acid portion of cyanolipids also are in various disciplines to delimit artificially their respective incorporated into primary metabolites during germination. areas of research, rather than attempt to understand the entire Secondary metabolites of these structural types are accumu­ system of living organisms. This was a pragmatic and neces­ lated in large quantities in the seeds of several plant groups sary way to develop an understanding for the various parts. where they probably fulfill an additional function as deter­ We are now at a point, however, where we need to investi­ rents to general predation. gate those things common to the parts and, specifically, those The second type of relationship involves interaction of things that unify the parts. The fundamental aspects of many plants with other organisms and with their environment. Bio­ of these interactions are chemical in nature. Plants constitute logical interactions must be viewed in the light of evolution­ an essential part of all life systems; phytochemistry provides ary change and the coadaptation, or perhaps coevolution, of a medium for linking several fields of study.

Keywords

Alanin Amino acid Phenylalanin Terpene Tyrosin biochemistry botanics metabolism

Authors and affiliations

  • David S. Seigler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant BiologyUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA

Bibliographic information