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© 2013

The Soyuz Launch Vehicle

The Two Lives of an Engineering Triumph

Book

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Also part of the Space Exploration book sub series (SPACEE)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xv
  2. Soyuz in the East

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Christian Lardier, Stefan Barensky
      Pages 3-42
    3. Christian Lardier, Stefan Barensky
      Pages 43-70
    4. Christian Lardier, Stefan Barensky
      Pages 71-103
    5. Christian Lardier, Stefan Barensky
      Pages 105-136
    6. Christian Lardier, Stefan Barensky
      Pages 137-185
    7. Christian Lardier, Stefan Barensky
      Pages 187-204
  3. Soyuz in the West

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 205-205
    2. Christian Lardier, Stefan Barensky
      Pages 207-235
    3. Christian Lardier, Stefan Barensky
      Pages 237-255
    4. Christian Lardier, Stefan Barensky
      Pages 257-284
    5. Christian Lardier, Stefan Barensky
      Pages 285-315
    6. Christian Lardier, Stefan Barensky
      Pages 317-348
    7. Christian Lardier, Stefan Barensky
      Pages 349-376
  4. Back Matter
    Pages 377-487

About this book

Introduction

The Soyuz launch vehicle has had a long and illustrious history. Built as the world's first intercontinental missile, it took the first man into space in April 1961, before becoming the workhorse of Russian spaceflight, launching satellites, interplanetary probes, every cosmonaut from Gagarin onwards, and, now, the multinational crews of the International Space Station.

This remarkable book gives a complete and accurate description of the two lives of Soyuz, chronicling the cooperative space endeavor of Europe and Russia. First, it takes us back to the early days of astronautics, when technology served politics. From archives found in the Soviet Union the authors describe the difficulty of designing a rocket in the immediate post-war period. Then, in Soyuz's golden age, it launched numerous scientific missions and manned flights which were publicized worldwide while the many more numerous military missions were kept highly confidential!

The second part of the book tells the contemporary story of the second life of Soyuz, gathered from Western sources and interviews with key protagonists. It addresses the sensitive issue of the strategic choices that led to the establishment of Soyuz in French Guiana, describing the role of a few visionaries in Russia and in Europe who decided to leave their respective isolation behind and bring Syouz and Ariane together.

In the final analysis, this book is a profound description of a formidable human adventure.

Keywords

French Guiana Space Centre International Space Station Interplanetary Probes Manned Spacecraft Russian Space Program Russian Spaceflight Satellite Launch Soyuz Vehicle Space Probes Yuri Gagarin

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.ParisFrance
  2. 2.JaillansFrance

About the authors

Christian Lardier has been space editor at Air & Cosmos (www.air-cosmos.com), an aerospace industry news source since 1994, and is the author of several magazine articles as well as the book “La cosmonautique soviétque” (Armand Colin, 1992). From 1991 to 1996, Lardier was accredited by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Moscow. To write this book, “The Soyuz Launch Vehicle,” Lardier worked with specialists at the State Research and Production Space-Rocket Center of Samara.
 
Born in 1965, Stefan Barensky is a professional science and technology writer. He has been reporting on space technologies and industries since 1991 as an editor for multiple French and international space, trade, and political publications such as “Science & Vie,” “Interavia,” “Air & Cosmos,” “Aero Defense News,” and “European Voice.” A former space transportation analyst at Euroconsult and Launchspace, and editor-in-chief of the Orbital Launcher Report monthly newsletter, he also witnessed the gradual Westernizing of Soyuz from the inside as an editorial consultant to Aerospatiale (now Astrium), Arianespace, CNES, ESA.

Bibliographic information