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An Introduction to Formal Language Theory

  • Robert N. Moll
  • Michael A. Arbib
  • A. J. Kfoury

Part of the Texts and Monographs in Computer Science book series (MCS)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. Robert N. Moll, Michael A. Arbib, A. J. Kfoury
    Pages 1-21
  3. Robert N. Moll, Michael A. Arbib, A. J. Kfoury
    Pages 22-45
  4. Robert N. Moll, Michael A. Arbib, A. J. Kfoury
    Pages 46-63
  5. Robert N. Moll, Michael A. Arbib, A. J. Kfoury
    Pages 64-79
  6. Robert N. Moll, Michael A. Arbib, A. J. Kfoury
    Pages 80-107
  7. Robert N. Moll, Michael A. Arbib, A. J. Kfoury
    Pages 108-126
  8. Robert N. Moll, Michael A. Arbib, A. J. Kfoury
    Pages 127-143
  9. Robert N. Moll, Michael A. Arbib, A. J. Kfoury
    Pages 144-173
  10. Robert N. Moll, Michael A. Arbib, A. J. Kfoury
    Pages 174-195
  11. Back Matter
    Pages 196-205

About this book

Introduction

The study of formal languages and of related families of automata has long been at the core of theoretical computer science. Until recently, the main reasons for this centrality were connected with the specification and analy­ sis of programming languages, which led naturally to the following ques­ tions. How might a grammar be written for such a language? How could we check whether a text were or were not a well-formed program generated by that grammar? How could we parse a program to provide the structural analysis needed by a compiler? How could we check for ambiguity to en­ sure that a program has a unique analysis to be passed to the computer? This focus on programming languages has now been broadened by the in­ creasing concern of computer scientists with designing interfaces which allow humans to communicate with computers in a natural language, at least concerning problems in some well-delimited domain of discourse. The necessary work in computational linguistics draws on studies both within linguistics (the analysis of human languages) and within artificial intelligence. The present volume is the first textbook to combine the topics of formal language theory traditionally taught in the context of program­ ming languages with an introduction to issues in computational linguistics. It is one of a series, The AKM Series in Theoretical Computer Science, designed to make key mathematical developments in computer science readily accessible to undergraduate and beginning graduate students.

Keywords

Natural Turing algorithms automata formal language grammars

Authors and affiliations

  • Robert N. Moll
    • 1
  • Michael A. Arbib
    • 2
  • A. J. Kfoury
    • 3
  1. 1.University of Massachusetts at AmherstAmherstUSA
  2. 2.University of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Boston UniversityBostonUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4613-9595-9
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag New York 1988
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4613-9597-3
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4613-9595-9
  • Series Print ISSN 0172-603X
  • Buy this book on publisher's site