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© 1989

A Clinical Guide to the Treatment of the Human Stress Response

Book

Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xviii
  2. The Nature of Human Stress

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-2
    2. George S. Everly Jr.
      Pages 3-13
    3. George S. Everly Jr.
      Pages 49-59
    4. George S. Everly Jr.
      Pages 61-77
    5. George S. Everly Jr.
      Pages 79-97
  3. The Treatment of the Human Stress Response

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 99-102
    2. George S. Everly Jr.
      Pages 103-118
    3. Eileen R. Potocki, George S. Everly Jr.
      Pages 119-136
    4. George S. Everly Jr.
      Pages 137-147
    5. George S. Everly Jr.
      Pages 171-183
    6. George S. Everly Jr.
      Pages 185-200
    7. George S. Everly Jr.
      Pages 201-210
    8. Joseph E. Mallet
      Pages 211-231
    9. George S. Everly Jr.
      Pages 233-246
    10. Robert Rosenfeld, George S. Everly Jr.
      Pages 247-259
    11. George S. Everly Jr.
      Pages 261-274
  4. Special Topics in the Treatment of the Human Stress Response

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 275-276

About this book

Introduction

In 1981, Plenum Press published a text entitled The Nature and Treatment of the Stress Response by Robert Rosenfeld, M. D. , and me. That text attempted to do what no other text from a major publisher had previously attempted, that is, to create a clinically practical guide for the treatment of excessive stress and its arousal-related syndromes-this to be captured between the same covers in combination with a detailed, clinically relevant pedagogy on the neurological and endocrinological foundations of the stress re­ sponse itself. That volume has enjoyed considerable success having found markets among practicing professionals and clinical students as well. The fields of psychosomatic medicine, health psychology, behavioral medicine, and applied stress research have appreciably expanded their boundaries since the publication of the aforementioned volume. Although remarkably little of the clinical utility of that volume has been eroded with time, it was felt that an updated and more integrative clinical textbook needed to be offered to practicing clinicians and students within clinical rather than simply create a second edition of training programs. Therefore, was made to create a significantly revised the original volume, the decision and expanded volume that would cover many of the same topics as the original volume but would provide a primary emphasis on the treatment of excessive stress and that would employ an integrative phenomenological model to facilitate that end. This present volume entitled A Clinical Guide to the Treatment of the Human Stress Response is the result.

Keywords

Arousal Syndrom cognition diagnosis electroencephalography (EEG) neuroanatomy posttraumatic stress disorder psychiatric disorder psychology psychosocial stress psychosomatic medicine psychotherapy stress stress management syndromes

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

Bibliographic information

  • Book Title A Clinical Guide to the Treatment of the Human Stress Response
  • Authors George S. Everly Jr.
  • Series Title The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping
  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4613-0741-9
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag US 1989
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Hardcover ISBN 978-0-306-43068-8
  • Softcover ISBN 978-1-4612-8059-0
  • eBook ISBN 978-1-4613-0741-9
  • Edition Number 1
  • Number of Pages , 406
  • Number of Illustrations 0 b/w illustrations, 0 illustrations in colour
  • Topics Clinical Psychology
    Psychotherapy and Counseling
  • Buy this book on publisher's site

Reviews

`... a landmark contribution. ... the most comprehensive review to date of the various definitions and theories about human stress in a clear, concise fashion. ... it provides a practical approach to the prevention and treatment of such problems that is scientifically sound.'
Paul J. Rosch, President, The American Institute of Stress