Advertisement

Modern Instrumentation for Scientists and Engineers

  • James A. Blackburn

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xv
  2. Electronics

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 3-6
    3. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 7-10
    4. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 11-25
    5. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 27-36
    6. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 37-56
    7. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 57-71
    8. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 73-91
    9. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 93-120
  3. Sensors

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 121-121
    2. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 123-156
    3. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 157-169
    4. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 171-179
    5. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 181-193
    6. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 195-207
    7. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 209-219
    8. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 221-235
  4. Measurements

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 237-237
    2. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 239-263
    3. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 265-278
    4. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 279-292
    5. James A. Blackburn
      Pages 293-316
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 317-319

About this book

Introduction

Knowledge of instrumentation is for experimentalists a kind of fluency in the language of measurement. But it is a fluency not so commonly possessed, and without which much of the experimental process remains hidden and mysterious. The basic goal in writing this book is to provide a treatment of useful depth of the basic elements of the instrumentation "language," namely electronics, sensors, and measurement. The present epoch is arguably a golden age for instrumentation. The crucial ingredient has been the exceptional development of semiconductor fabrication technology, and this has led to the present richness in both analog and digital inte­ grated circuits. The former provide relatively inexpensive but high-performance electronic modules (such as the operational amplifier) which can serve as build­ ing blocks for more complex circuits, whereas the latter have culminated in the desktop computer, which has permeated modem life generally and revolu­ tionized the instrumentation world with its capacity to act as a measurement controller and data storage center. Finally, silicon micromachining is creating a host of new sensors for such quantities as acceleration and pressure.

Keywords

Experiment Sensor Waveform biology data acquisition geophysics temperature

Authors and affiliations

  • James A. Blackburn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physics and ComputingWilfrid Laurier UniversityWaterlooCanada

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4613-0103-5
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 2001
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4612-6512-2
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4613-0103-5
  • Buy this book on publisher's site