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Fjords

Processes and Products

  • James P. M. Syvitski
  • David C. Burrell
  • Jens M. Skei

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. Introduction

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. James P. M. Syvitski, David C. Burrell, Jens M. Skei
      Pages 3-17
    3. James P. M. Syvitski, David C. Burrell, Jens M. Skei
      Pages 19-69
  3. Processes and Products

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 71-71
    2. James P. M. Syvitski, David C. Burrell, Jens M. Skei
      Pages 73-110
    3. James P. M. Syvitski, David C. Burrell, Jens M. Skei
      Pages 111-174
    4. James P. M. Syvitski, David C. Burrell, Jens M. Skei
      Pages 175-209
    5. James P. M. Syvitski, David C. Burrell, Jens M. Skei
      Pages 211-240
    6. James P. M. Syvitski, David C. Burrell, Jens M. Skei
      Pages 241-270
  4. Implications/Applications

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 271-271
    2. James P. M. Syvitski, David C. Burrell, Jens M. Skei
      Pages 273-322
    3. James P. M. Syvitski, David C. Burrell, Jens M. Skei
      Pages 323-328
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 329-379

About this book

Introduction

Fjords are both an interface and a buffer between glaciated continents and the oceans. They exhibit a very wide range in environmental conditions, both in dynamics and geography. Some are truly wonders of the world with their dizzying mountain slopes rising sharply from the ocean edge. Others represent some of the harshest conditions on earth, with hurricane winds, extremes in temperature, and catastrophic earth and ice movements. Fjords are unique estuaries and represent a large portion of the earth's coastal zone. Yet they are not very well known, given the increasing population and food pressures, and their present industrial and strategic importance. Temperate­ zone estuaries have had many more years of intense study, with multiyear data available. Most fjords have not been impacted by man but, if history repeats itself, that condition will not last long. Fjords present some unique environmental problems, such as their usually slow flushing time, a feature common to many silled environments. Thus there is presently a need for management guidelines, which can only be based on a thorough knowledge of the way fjords work. Fjords are, in many respects, perfect natural oceanographic and geologic lab­ oratories. Source inputs are easily identified and their resulting gradients are well developed. Throughout this book, we emphasize the potential of modeling pro­ cesses in fjords, with comparisons to other estuary, lake, shelf and slope, and open ocean environments.

Keywords

Coast Ocean Sediment Sedimentation diagenesis environment fluvial geochemistry geomorphology temperature transport

Authors and affiliations

  • James P. M. Syvitski
    • 1
  • David C. Burrell
    • 2
  • Jens M. Skei
    • 3
  1. 1.Bedford Institute of OceanographyGeological Survey of CanadaDartmouthCanada
  2. 2.Institute of Marine ScienceUniversity of AlaskaFairbanksUSA
  3. 3.Norwegian Institute for Water ResearchOslo 3Norway

Bibliographic information