Measure and Integral

Volume 1

  • John L. Kelley
  • T. P. Srinivasan

Part of the Graduate Texts in Mathematics book series (GTM, volume 116)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. John L. Kelley, T. P. Srinivasan
    Pages 1-7
  3. John L. Kelley, T. P. Srinivasan
    Pages 8-20
  4. John L. Kelley, T. P. Srinivasan
    Pages 21-31
  5. John L. Kelley, T. P. Srinivasan
    Pages 32-41
  6. John L. Kelley, T. P. Srinivasan
    Pages 42-53
  7. John L. Kelley, T. P. Srinivasan
    Pages 54-64
  8. John L. Kelley, T. P. Srinivasan
    Pages 65-79
  9. John L. Kelley, T. P. Srinivasan
    Pages 80-90
  10. John L. Kelley, T. P. Srinivasan
    Pages 91-107
  11. John L. Kelley, T. P. Srinivasan
    Pages 108-120
  12. John L. Kelley, T. P. Srinivasan
    Pages 121-139
  13. Back Matter
    Pages 140-150

About this book

Introduction

This is a systematic exposition of the basic part of the theory of mea­ sure and integration. The book is intended to be a usable text for students with no previous knowledge of measure theory or Lebesgue integration, but it is also intended to include the results most com­ monly used in functional analysis. Our two intentions are some what conflicting, and we have attempted a resolution as follows. The main body of the text requires only a first course in analysis as background. It is a study of abstract measures and integrals, and comprises a reasonably complete account of Borel measures and in­ tegration for R Each chapter is generally followed by one or more supplements. These, comprising over a third of the book, require some­ what more mathematical background and maturity than the body of the text (in particular, some knowledge of general topology is assumed) and the presentation is a little more brisk and informal. The material presented includes the theory of Borel measures and integration for ~n, the general theory of integration for locally compact Hausdorff spaces, and the first dozen results about invariant measures for groups. Most of the results expounded here are conventional in general character, if not in detail, but the methods are less so. The following brief overview may clarify this assertion.

Keywords

banach spaces convergence integral integration maximum measure

Authors and affiliations

  • John L. Kelley
    • 1
  • T. P. Srinivasan
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MathematicsUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Department of MathematicsThe University of KansasLawrenceUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-4570-4
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag New York 1988
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4612-8928-9
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4612-4570-4
  • Series Print ISSN 0072-5285
  • About this book