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Structure of Decidable Locally Finite Varieties

  • Ralph McKenzie
  • Matthew Valeriote

Part of the Progress in Mathematics book series (PM, volume 79)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-viii
  2. Introduction

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-3
    2. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 5-33
    3. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 35-36
  3. Structured varieties

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 37-37
    2. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 39-55
    3. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 57-64
    4. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 65-71
    5. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 73-74
    6. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 75-89
    7. Back Matter
      Pages 91-91
  4. Structured Abelian varieties

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 93-93
    2. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 95-98
    3. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 99-102
    4. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 103-105
    5. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 107-128
    6. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 129-148
    7. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 149-167
  5. The decomposition

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 169-169
    2. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 171-192
    3. Ralph McKenzie, Matthew Valeriote
      Pages 193-197
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 199-215

About this book

Introduction

A mathematically precise definition of the intuitive notion of "algorithm" was implicit in Kurt Godel's [1931] paper on formally undecidable propo­ sitions of arithmetic. During the 1930s, in the work of such mathemati­ cians as Alonzo Church, Stephen Kleene, Barkley Rosser and Alfred Tarski, Godel's idea evolved into the concept of a recursive function. Church pro­ posed the thesis, generally accepted today, that an effective algorithm is the same thing as a procedure whose output is a recursive function of the input (suitably coded as an integer). With these concepts, it became possible to prove that many familiar theories are undecidable (or non-recursive)-i. e. , that there does not exist an effective algorithm (recursive function) which would allow one to determine which sentences belong to the theory. It was clear from the beginning that any theory with a rich enough mathematical content must be undecidable. On the other hand, some theories with a substantial content are decidable. Examples of such decidabLe theories are the theory of Boolean algebras (Tarski [1949]), the theory of Abelian groups (Szmiele~ [1955]), and the theories of elementary arithmetic and geometry (Tarski [1951]' but Tarski discovered these results around 1930). The de­ termination of precise lines of division between the classes of decidable and undecidable theories became an important goal of research in this area. algebra we mean simply any structure (A, h(i E I)} consisting of By an a nonvoid set A and a system of finitary operations Ii over A.

Keywords

Abelian group Boolean algebra Finite Mathematica algebra algorithms boundary element method decidability eXist function geometry language set system theorem

Authors and affiliations

  • Ralph McKenzie
    • 1
  • Matthew Valeriote
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MathematicsUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Department of Mathematics and StatisticsMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-4552-0
  • Copyright Information Birkhäuser Boston 1989
  • Publisher Name Birkhäuser Boston
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4612-8908-1
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4612-4552-0
  • Series Print ISSN 0743-1643
  • Series Online ISSN 2296-505X
  • Buy this book on publisher's site