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Post Mortem Technique Handbook

  • Michael T. Sheaff
  • Deborah J. Hopster

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XII
  2. Michael T. Sheaff, Deborah J. Hopster
    Pages 1-31
  3. Michael T. Sheaff, Deborah J. Hopster
    Pages 33-52
  4. Michael T. Sheaff, Deborah J. Hopster
    Pages 53-72
  5. Michael T. Sheaff, Deborah J. Hopster
    Pages 73-85
  6. Michael T. Sheaff, Deborah J. Hopster
    Pages 87-116
  7. Michael T. Sheaff, Deborah J. Hopster
    Pages 117-129
  8. Michael T. Sheaff, Deborah J. Hopster
    Pages 131-143
  9. Michael T. Sheaff, Deborah J. Hopster
    Pages 145-161
  10. Michael T. Sheaff, Deborah J. Hopster
    Pages 163-169
  11. Michael T. Sheaff, Deborah J. Hopster
    Pages 171-177
  12. Michael T. Sheaff, Deborah J. Hopster
    Pages 179-195
  13. Michael T. Sheaff, Deborah J. Hopster
    Pages 197-223
  14. Michael T. Sheaff, Deborah J. Hopster
    Pages 225-245
  15. Michael T. Sheaff, Deborah J. Hopster
    Pages 247-290
  16. Back Matter
    Pages 291-306

About this book

Introduction

The relentless decline in the hospital based autopsy has been documented else­ where in detail and has been generally deplored as a loss of an important method of "quality control" at a time when the practise of Medicine is closely scrutinised. This is not the place to revisit these well-rehearsed arguments but the change itself provides a powerful justification for the production of this book. The decrease in clinically requested autopsies in hospitals leaves a large and increasing number of Coronial autopsies to be done; many of these in circum­ stances of discontent with some aspect of the medical or other management of the events which ultimately lead to death. The pathologists now performing these autopsies will not have had the amount of experience that was commonplace among their predecessors; an experience of carrying out procedures which, although devised for different purposes, can provide a more complete examina­ tion of the whole body than often appears necessary in straightforward deaths in the community. In my first two years in Pathology I performed 200 autopsies; most of my contemporaries will have had a similar grounding - it would not be possi­ ble to provide this experience for staff in training now, except in some parts of the European mainland. So there is a need to provide a written but practical account of the autopsy which will help those who may find themselves in unfamiliar territory.

Keywords

Post Mortem Techniques cardiovascular cardiovascular system death education evaluation forensic medicine hospital medical education nervous system organ pathology respiratory system training trust

Authors and affiliations

  • Michael T. Sheaff
    • 1
  • Deborah J. Hopster
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Morbid Anatomy and HistopathologyRoyal London HospitalLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of HistopathologyKing’s College HospitalLondonUK

Bibliographic information