Advertisement

The Craniosynostoses

Causes, Natural History, and Management

  • David John David
  • David Ernest Poswillo
  • Donald Allen Simpson

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. Causes and Effects

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 3-6
    3. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 7-34
    4. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 35-41
    5. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 42-53
    6. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 54-56
  3. Symptoms and Strategies

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 57-57
    2. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 59-75
    3. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 76-88
    4. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 89-105
  4. Simple Calvarial Deformities

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 107-107
    2. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 109-116
    3. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 117-132
    4. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 133-140
    5. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 141-152
    6. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 153-173
    7. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 174-181
  5. Complex Craniofacial Deformities

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 183-183
    2. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 185-228
    3. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 229-282
    4. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 283-289
    5. David John David, David Ernest Poswillo, Donald Allen Simpson
      Pages 290-295
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 296-334

About this book

Introduction

The human skull has many functions. The largest component of the skull, the neurocranium, protects and insulates the brain. It comprises the dome-shaped vault or calvaria, obviously a protective structure, and the more complex cranial base, which gives the vault a massive foundation and also houses the organs of hearing, balance, and smell. The facial skeleton, or splanchnocranium, encloses the upper airway and the mouth. Chewing, the cQ-ordinated action ofthe jaws and teeth, is a function of the facial skeleton. The orbits, formed from both calvarial and facial bones, house the eyes and their accessory muscles. The'skull also provides skeletal support for the muscles which affect speech and facial expression. It is largely by these that people communicate and display their emotions. Personality is judged on speech and on facial appearances, by conscious or subconscious aesthetic comparisons with cultural ideas-and prejudices. So the shape of the skull has, or can have, profound emotional significance.

Keywords

Kraniosynostose base brain cranium emotion hearing muscle personality skeleton speech surgery

Authors and affiliations

  • David John David
    • 1
  • David Ernest Poswillo
    • 2
  • Donald Allen Simpson
    • 3
  1. 1.South Australian Cranio-Facial UnitAdelaide Chidren’s HospitalNorth AdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.School of Dental Surgery, Royal Dental HospitalUniversity of LondonLondonUK
  3. 3.Adelaide Children’s HospitalNorth AdelaideAustralia

Bibliographic information