The Economic Impact of Public Support to Agriculture

An International Perspective

  • V. Eldon Ball
  • Roberto Fanfani
  • Luciano Gutierrez
Part of the Studies in Productivity and Efficiency book series (SIPE, volume 7)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xi
  2. New Directions in Agricultural Policy: US and European Perspectives

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 9-9
  3. Introduction and Overview

    1. V. Eldon Ball, Roberto Fanfani, Luciano Gutierrez
      Pages 1-8
  4. New Directions in Agricultural Policy: US and European Perspectives

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 9-9
    2. Carmel Cahill, Roger Martini
      Pages 11-39
    3. Andrew Schmitz, Troy G. Schmitz
      Pages 41-66
    4. Julian M. Alston
      Pages 81-105
  5. Agricultural Policy and Economic Performance

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 107-107
    2. Subal C. Kumbhakar, Gudbrand Lien
      Pages 109-124
    3. V. Eldon Ball, Rolf Färe, Shawna Grosskopf, Dimitri Margaritis
      Pages 125-139
  6. Energy and Agricultural Policy

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 141-141
    2. May Peters, Richard Stillman, Agapi Somwaru
      Pages 143-154
    3. C. S. Kim, Glenn Schaible, Stan Daberkow
      Pages 171-190
  7. International Trade and Domestic Agricultural Policy

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 211-211
    2. V. Eldon Ball, J.-P. Butault, Carlos San Juan, Ricardo Mora
      Pages 243-271
    3. Luciano Gutierrez, Cristina Brasili, Roberto Fanfani
      Pages 273-289

About this book

Introduction

The recent reforms of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) of the European Union extend in a significant way the “decoupling” process started some ten years earlier. By adopting the Single Farm Payment (SFP) scheme only limited support for agriculture is tied to current production decisions. This is also true of U.S. farm policy. The reform act of 1996 introduced greater planting flexibility, shifted some support to direct payments, and eliminated the authority for acreage reduction programs. The 2002 and 2008 Acts retained these features. However, they added countercyclical components to direct payments based on market prices and historic production, and allowed for updating of base acreage underlying direct payments. These steps arguably reintroduced ties between support and production decisions. This volume explores the economic implications of these recent changes in the design of agricultural policies for the economic performance of the sector in the European Union and the United States. The book is organized around five themes: (1) New Directions in Agricultural Policy: U.S. and EU Perspectives; (2) Agricultural Policy and Economic performance; (3) Energy and Agricultural Policy; (4) International Trade and Agricultural Policy; and (5) Commodity Programs and Risk Management. The authors apply rigorous tools to analyze the impact and implications of current agricultural policies on efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness in the sector, and consider opportunities for improvement in policymaking and practice.

Keywords

Agricultural Economics Agricultural Policy Agriculture Bio-fuels Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) Efficiency Productivity U.S. Farm Bill compliance political economy

Editors and affiliations

  • V. Eldon Ball
    • 1
  • Roberto Fanfani
    • 2
  • Luciano Gutierrez
    • 3
  1. 1.Economic Research ServiceU.S. Dept. of AgricultureWashingtonUSA
  2. 2., Department of StatisticsUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly
  3. 3.University of SassariSassariItaly

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-6385-7
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag New York 2010
  • Publisher Name Springer, New York, NY
  • eBook Packages Business and Economics
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4419-6384-0
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4419-6385-7