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Extreme Programming Refactored: The Case Against XP

  • Authors
  • Matt Stephens
  • Doug Rosenberg

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages N2-xxviii
  2. Another Fine Mess You’ve Gotten Me Into (Laurel and Hardy, Take Up Programming)

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 3-29
    3. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 31-56
    4. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 57-82
  3. Social Aspects of XP (Mama Don’t Let Your Coders Grow Up to Be Cowboys)

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 83-83
    2. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 85-116
    3. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 117-134
    4. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 135-160
    5. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 161-179
  4. We Don’t Write Permanent Specs and Barely Do Any Upfront Design, So.

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 181-181
    2. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 183-200
    3. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 227-245
  5. The Perpetual Coding Machine

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 247-247
    2. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 249-267
    3. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 269-292
    4. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 293-310
  6. The Big Picture

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 311-311
    2. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 313-335
    3. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 337-369
    4. Matt Stephens, Doug Rosenberg
      Pages 371-382
  7. Back Matter
    Pages 383-401

About this book

Introduction

Extreme Programming Refactored: The Case Against XP (featuring Songs of the Extremos) takes a satirical look at the increasingly-hyped extreme programming (XP) methodology. It explores some quite astonishing Extremo quotes that have typified the XP approach quotes such as, “XPers are not afraid of oral documentation,” “Schedule is the customer's problem,” “Dependencies between requirements are more a matter of fear than reality” and “Concentration is the enemy.”

In between the chuckles, though, there is a serious analysis of XP's many flaws. The authors also examine C3, the first XP project, whose team (most of whom went on to get XP book deals shortly before C3's cancellation) described themselves as "the best team on the face of the Earth." (In a later chapter, the authors also note that one problem which can affect pair programmers is overconfidence—or is that "eXcessive courage"?). The authors examine whether the problems that led to C3's “inexplicable” cancellation could also afflict present-day XP projects.

In the final chapter, Refactoring XP, Matt and Doug suggest some ways of achieving the agile goals of XP using some XP practices (used in moderation) combined with other, less risk-laden methods.

Keywords

Ada ChucK Factor Refactoring Scala Turing object oriented design programming

Bibliographic information