Early Nutrition Programming and Health Outcomes in Later Life

Obesity and Beyond

  • Berthold Koletzko
  • Tamás Decsi
  • Dées Molnár
  • Anne de la Hunty

Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 646)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. B. Koletzko, R. von Kries, R. C. Monasterolo, J. E. Subias, S. Scaglioni, M. Giovannini et al.
    Pages 15-29
  3. C. Cooper, N. Harvey, Z. Cole, M. Hanson, E. Dennison
    Pages 31-39
  4. A. Singhal
    Pages 51-58
  5. I. Caroline McMillen, Leewen Rattanatray, Jaime A. Duffield, Janna L. Morrison, Severence M. MacLaughlin, Sheridan Gentili et al.
    Pages 71-81
  6. Michael E. Symonds, Terence Stephenson, David S. Gardner, Helen Budge
    Pages 113-118
  7. J. C. Mathers, Jill A. McKay
    Pages 119-123
  8. Francesc Villarroya, Carlos Bocos, Marta Giralt, Maria Pilar Ramos, Emilio Herrera, Julio Sevillano et al.
    Pages 141-148
  9. Tamás Marosvölgyi, Cristina Campoy, Berthold Koletzko, Éva Szabó, Viktoria Jakobik, Margarita Jimenez et al.
    Pages 159-163
  10. Sirinuch Chomtho, Jonathan C. K. Wells, Peter S. Davies, Alan Lucas, M. S. Fewtrell
    Pages 165-168

About these proceedings

Introduction

Obesity has reached epidemic proportions globally and presents a major challenge to policy makers and clinicians alike. Recent research has suggested that obesity has its origins in early life and that early diet can programme a developing fetus’ and young infant’s future susceptibility to obesity.  This volume contains recent findings presented at the International Conference on Early Nutrition Programming and Health Outcomes in Later Life: Obesity and Beyond - a satellite meeting of the 15th European Congress on Obesity, held in Budapest in April 2007. Basic scientific research, data from epidemiological studies and clinical trial results were all presented during the programme.

This volume includes articles discussing the evidence for an effect of early nutrition programming on later obesity and cardiovascular risk; the growing evidence for an intergenerational cycle of obesity; the role of maternal leptin in programming appetite; possible cellular mechanisms for altered energy balance, including mitochondrial programming and the effects of regulators of metabolism; and how epigenetic changes might be the fundamental underlying mechanism explaining programming effects. Consumer understanding of the concept of early nutrition programming and the extent to which early nutrition programming is taken into account in infant feeding policies are also discussed.

Keywords

body composition child childhood genetics growth health membrane metabolism nutrition obesity

Editors and affiliations

  • Berthold Koletzko
    • 1
  • Tamás Decsi
    • 2
  • Dées Molnár
    • 2
  • Anne de la Hunty
    • 3
  1. 1.Dr. von Hauner Children's HospitalLudwig-Maximilians-University of MunichGermany
  2. 2.Department of PaediatricsUniversity of PécsPécsHungary
  3. 3.Ashwell Associates (Europe) Ltd.Ashwell HertfordshireUK

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-9173-5
  • Copyright Information Springer Netherlands 2009
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Biomedical and Life Sciences
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4020-9172-8
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4020-9173-5
  • Series Print ISSN 0065-2598
  • About this book