Barometers of Quality of Life Around the Globe

How Are We Doing?

  • Valerie Møller
  • Denis Huschka
  • Alex C. Michalos

Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 33)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XXII
  2. Mahar Mangahas, Linda Luz B. Guerrero
    Pages 23-36
  3. Jack Kruse, Birger Poppel, Larissa Abryutina, Gerard Duhaime, Stephanie Martin, Mariekathrine Poppel et al.
    Pages 107-134
  4. Robert A. Cummins, David Mellor, Mark A. Stokes, Anna A.L.D. Lau
    Pages 135-159
  5. Takashi Inoguchi, Seiji Fujii
    Pages 187-232
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 224-238

About this book

Introduction

Quality of life (QOL) research has made great strides since the social indicator movement started as a scientific enterprise in the 1960s. Following the lead of pioneers in North America and Europe, social scientists in other regions of the world have adopted and refined social data systems or barometers to monitor progress in enhancing the welfare and well-being of citizens. A distinctive feature of these barometers is that they measure both individual and societal quality of life. While not overlooking the more basic needs and material standards of living, the barometers also inform on issues of individual freedoms and choices and constraints on citizen empowerment that enhance and depress quality of life. Designed to capture nuances in local definitions of the good life, regional barometers are unique expressions of the obstacles facing different societies in their quest to achieve the good life. Scholars of public policy as well as policy makers will find inspiration from reviews of innovative initiatives to monitor contemporary quality of life in six regions of the world spanning South America, the Arctic, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia.

Keywords

politics quality of life social development social indicators social policy social trends

Editors and affiliations

  • Valerie Møller
    • 1
  • Denis Huschka
    • 2
  • Alex C. Michalos
    • 3
  1. 1.Rhodes University Inst. Social & Economic ResearchGrahamstown6140 South Africa
  2. 2.German Council for Social and Economic DataGermany
  3. 3.University of Northern British ColumbiaPrince GeorgeCanada

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-8686-1
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Humanities, Social Sciences and Law
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4020-8685-4
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4020-8686-1
  • Series Print ISSN 1387-6570
  • About this book