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Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. D. C. R. A. Goonetilleke
    Pages 1-15
  3. D. C. R. A. Goonetilleke
    Pages 16-45
  4. D. C. R. A. Goonetilleke
    Pages 46-67
  5. D. C. R. A. Goonetilleke
    Pages 68-106
  6. D. C. R. A. Goonetilleke
    Pages 107-123
  7. D. C. R. A. Goonetilleke
    Pages 124-132
  8. D. C. R. A. Goonetilleke
    Pages 133-147
  9. D. C. R. A. Goonetilleke
    Pages 148-150
  10. Back Matter
    Pages 151-168

About this book

Introduction

In this valuable study of Salman Rushdie, currently the world's most controversial writer, Professor Goonetilleke examines 'the Rushdie affair', but his focus is on Rushdie as a novelist. He considers Rushdie's fiction as art, tracing the collage of autobiographical and historical elements and analyses Rushdie's complex position as a migrant writer, drawing on the cultural riches of two hemispheres while not belonging fully to either. Rushdie emerges as the most important and innovative novelist in English since World War II.

Keywords

art bibliography drawing English fiction migrant World War II

Bibliographic information