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The Success of Competitive-Communism in Japan

  • Douglas Moore Kenrick

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xi
  2. Introduction

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 3-13
    3. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 14-23
  3. Communistic Behaviour and Social Structure

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 25-25
    2. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 27-34
    3. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 35-44
    4. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 45-54
    5. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 55-62
  4. Continuity and Transmission of an Ancient Social Structure

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 63-63
    2. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 65-74
    3. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 75-81
    4. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 82-91
    5. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 92-103
    6. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 104-111
    7. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 112-120
    8. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 121-138
  5. Japan in Recent Years

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 139-139
    2. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 141-148
    3. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 149-161
    4. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 162-174
    5. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 175-181
    6. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 182-192
    7. Douglas Moore Kenrick
      Pages 193-198
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 199-201

About this book

Introduction

For centuries Japan, although a totalitarian dictatorship, was ruled by figureheads who signed laws formulated 'behind the screen'. Hierarchy still defines everyone's status. The man at the top has power but jeopardizes his position if he ignores consensus opinions. Nowadays fashionable twentieth-century clothing cloaks a contradictory blend of intense competition with a tradition of harmony dependent on close human-relations and complex communal restraint. The Japanese organise themselves in cliques (not groups) which raise barriers against outsiders. Companies are controlled from within; shareholders are outsiders. Women are more than equal in their homes; less than equal at work. After living and managing his own business in Japan for forty years, the author explored widely before coining the term 'competitive communism' to describe Japan's economic and social system.

Keywords

business communication communism religion

Authors and affiliations

  • Douglas Moore Kenrick
    • 1
  1. 1.Asiatic Society of JapanJapan

Bibliographic information