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Around the Sacred Fire

Native Religious Activism in the Red Power Era

  • Authors
  • James Treat

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-viii
  2. Prologue

    1. James Treat
      Pages 1-10
  3. Contexts

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 11-12
    2. James Treat
      Pages 13-36
    3. James Treat
      Pages 37-60
    4. James Treat
      Pages 61-88
    5. James Treat
      Pages 89-120
  4. Conversations

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 121-122
    2. James Treat
      Pages 123-170
  5. Consequences

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 171-172
    2. James Treat
      Pages 173-200
    3. James Treat
      Pages 201-228
    4. James Treat
      Pages 229-256
    5. James Treat
      Pages 257-290
  6. Epilogue

    1. James Treat
      Pages 291-306
  7. Back Matter
    Pages 307-376

About this book

Introduction

Around the Sacred Fire is a compelling cultural history of intertribal activism centered on the Indian Ecumenical Conference, an influential movement among native people in Canada and the U.S. during the Red Power era. Founded in 1969, the Conference began as an attempt at organizing grassroots spiritual leaders who were concerned about the conflict between tribal and Christian traditions throughout Indian country. By the mid-seventies thousands of people were gathering each summer in the foothills of the Rockies, where they participated in weeklong encampments promoting spiritual revitalization and religious self-determination. Most historical overviews of native affairs in the sixties and seventies emphasize the prominence of the American Indian Movement and the impact of highly publicized confrontations such as the Northwest Coast fish-ins, the Alcatraz occupation, and events at Wounded Knee. The Indian Ecumenical Conference played a central role in stimulating cultural revival among native people, partly because Conference leaders strategized for social change in ways that differed from the militant groups. Drawing on archival records, published accounts, oral histories, and field research, James Treat has written the first comprehensive study of this important but overlooked effort at postcolonial interreligious dialogue.

Keywords

Interreligious Dialogue religion social change

Bibliographic information