The Taking and Displaying of Human Body Parts as Trophies by Amerindians

  • RICHARD J. CHACON
  • David H. Dye

Part of the INTERDISCIPLINARY CONTRIBUTIONS TO ARCHAEOLOGY book series (IDCA)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XVII
  2. North America

    1. Front Matter
      Pages I-XVII
    2. WILLIAM WOODWORTH
      Pages 3-4
    3. RICHARD J. CHACON, DAVID H. DYE
      Pages 5-31
    4. HERBERT D. G. MASCHNER, KATHERINE L. REEDY-MASCHNER
      Pages 32-44
    5. JOAN A. LOVISEK
      Pages 45-64
    6. POLLY SCHAAFSMA
      Pages 90-123
    7. DOUGLAS W. OWSLEY, KARIN S. BRUWELHEIDE, LAURIE E. BURGESS, WILLIAM T. BILLECK
      Pages 124-166
    8. MARK F. SEEMAN
      Pages 167-189
    9. JAMES A. BROWN, DAVID H. DYE
      Pages 278-298
    10. KEITH P. JACOBI
      Pages 299-338
    11. NANCY A. ROSS-STALLINGS
      Pages 339-370
  3. Latin America

    1. Front Matter
      Pages I-XVII
    2. ALBERTO ESQUIT-CHOY
      Pages 373-376
    3. RUBÉN G. MENDOZA
      Pages 400-443

About this book

Introduction

The Amerindian (American Indian or Native American – reference to both North and South America) practice of taking and displaying various body parts as trophies has long intrigued both the research community as well as the public. As a subject that is both controversial and politically charged, it has also come under attack as a European colonists’ perspective intended to denigrate native peoples.

What this collection demonstrates is that the practice of trophy-taking predates European contact in the Americas but was also practiced in other parts of the world (Europe, Africa, Asia) and has been practiced prehistorically, historically and up to and including the twentieth century.

This edited volume mainly focuses on this practice in both North and South America. The editors and contributors (which include Native Peoples from both continents) examine the evidence and causes of Amerindian trophy taking as reflected in osteological, archaeological, ethnohistoric and ethnographic accounts. Additionally, they present objectively and discuss dispassionately the topic of human proclivity toward ritual violence.

Keywords

Amerindian Archaic period in North America Evolution Glas Human trophy taking Mesoamerica North and South America Ritual Vor- und Frühgeschichte complexity inca mayans native peoples

Editors and affiliations

  • RICHARD J. CHACON
    • 1
  • David H. Dye
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyWinthrop UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Department of Earth SciencesUniversity of MemphisMemphisUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-48303-0
  • Copyright Information Springer 2007
  • Publisher Name Springer, Boston, MA
  • eBook Packages Humanities, Social Sciences and Law
  • Print ISBN 978-0-387-48300-9
  • Online ISBN 978-0-387-48303-0
  • Series Print ISSN 1568-2722
  • About this book