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Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XIX
  2. Information and DNA

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 1-1
    2. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 3-28
    3. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 29-46
    4. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 47-66
  3. Parity and Non-Parity

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 67-67
    2. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 69-88
    3. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 89-104
    4. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 105-120
  4. Mutation and Speciation

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 121-121
    2. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 123-154
    3. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 155-180
  5. Conflict within Genomes

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 181-181
    2. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 183-206
    3. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 207-224
    4. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 225-247
  6. Conflict between Genomes

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 249-249
    2. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 250-272
    3. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 273-290
  7. Sex and Error-Correction

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 291-291
    2. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 293-313
    3. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 315-324
    4. Donald R. Forsdyke
      Pages 325-335
  8. Back Matter
    Pages 337-424

About this book

Introduction

Evolutionary Bioinformatics aims to make the "new" information-based (rather than gene-based) bioinformatics intelligible both to the "bio" people and the "info" people. Books on bioinformatics have traditionally served gene-hunters, and biologists who wish to construct family trees showing tidy lines of descent. While dealing extensively with the exciting topics of gene discovery and database-searching, such books have hardly considered genomes as information channels through which multiple forms and levels of information have passed through the generations. This "new bioinformatics," contrasts with the "old" gene-based bioinformatics that so preoccupies previous texts.

Evolutionary Bioinformatics extends a line of evolutionary thought that leads from the nineteenth century (Darwin, Butler, Romanes, Bateson), through the twentieth (Goldschmidt, White), and into the twenty first (the final works of the late Stephen Jay Gould). Long an area of controversy, diverging views may now be reconciled. The book is unique in emphasising non-genic aspects of bioinformatics, and linking modern evolutionary biology to a history that extends back to the nineteenth century. Forms of information that we are familiar with (mental, textual) are related to forms we are less familiar with (hereditary).

Authors and affiliations

  • Donald R. Forsdyke
    • 1
  1. 1.Queen’s UniversityKingstonCanada

Bibliographic information