Spatial Cognition

An Interdisciplinary Approach to Representing and Processing Spatial Knowledge

  • Christian Freksa
  • Christopher Habel
  • Karl F. Wender

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1404)

Also part of the Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence book sub series (LNAI, volume 1404)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-VIII
  2. Spatial Knowledge Acquisition and Spatial Memory

    1. Karin Schweizer, Theo Herrmann, Gabriele Janzen, Steffi Katz
      Pages 19-38
    2. Silvia Mecklenbräuker, Werner Wippich, Monika Wagener, Jörg E. Saathoff
      Pages 39-61
    3. Rainer Rothkegel, Karl F. Wender, Sabine Schumacher
      Pages 79-105
    4. Steffen Werner, Christina Saade, Gerd Lüer
      Pages 107-127
    5. A. Eisenkolb, A. Musto, K. Schill, D. Hernández, W. Brauer
      Pages 129-155
  3. Formal and Linguistic Models

    1. Barbara Tversky, Paul U. Lee
      Pages 157-175
    2. Carola Eschenbach, Christopher Habel, Lars Kulik, Annette Leßmöllmann
      Pages 176-202
    3. Constanze Vorwerg, Gert Rickheit
      Pages 203-222
    4. Hubert D. Zimmer, Harry R. Speiser, Jörg Baus, Anselm Blocher, Eva Stopp
      Pages 223-240
    5. Berry Claus, Klaus Eyferth, Carsten Gips, Robin Hörnig, Ute Schmid, Sylvia Wiebrock et al.
      Pages 241-266
    6. Markus Knauff, Reinhold Rauh, Christoph Schlieder, Gerhard Strube
      Pages 267-291
    7. Bettina Berendt, Thomas Barkowsky, Christian Freksa, Stephanie Kelter
      Pages 313-336
    8. Jochen Renz, Bernhard Nebel
      Pages 351-371
  4. Navigation in Real and Virtual Worlds

    1. Bernd Krieg-Brückner, Thomas Röfer, Hans-Otto Carmesin, Rolf Müller
      Pages 373-397
    2. L. Nadel, K. G. F. Thomas, H. E. Laurance, R. Skelton, T. Tal, W. J. Jacobs
      Pages 399-427

About this book

Introduction

Research on spatial cognition is a rapidly evolving interdisciplinary enterprise for the study of spatial representations and cognitive spatial processes, be they real or abstract, human or machine. Spatial cognition brings together a variety of - search methodologies: empirical investigations on human and animal orientation and navigation; studies of communicating spatial knowledge using language and graphical or other pictorial means; the development of formal models for r- resenting and processing spatial knowledge; and computer implementations to solve spatial problems, to simulate human or animal orientation and navigation behavior, or to reproduce spatial communication patterns. These approaches can interact in interesting and useful ways: Results from empirical studies call for formal explanations both of the underlying memory structures and of the processes operating upon them; we can develop and - plement operational computer models obeying the relationships between objects and events described by the formal models; we can empirically test the computer models under a variety of conditions, and we can compare the results to the - sults from the human or animal experiments. A disagreement between these results can provide useful indications towards the re nement of the models.

Keywords

Knowledge Acquisition Linguistic Models Robot Navigation Spatial Memory Virtual Worlds cognition knowledge navigation

Editors and affiliations

  • Christian Freksa
    • 1
  • Christopher Habel
    • 1
  • Karl F. Wender
    • 2
  1. 1.Fachbereich InformatikUniversität HamburgHamburgGermany
  2. 2.Fachbereich PsychologieUniversität TrierTrierGermany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-69342-4
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-540-64603-7
  • Online ISBN 978-3-540-69342-0
  • Series Print ISSN 0302-9743
  • About this book