Trends in Distributed Systems: Towards a Universal Service Market

Third International IFIP/GI Working Conference, USM 2000, Munich, Germany, September 12-14, 2000 Proceedings

  • Claudia Linnhoff-Popien
  • Heinz-Gerd Hegering

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1890)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
  2. Invited Talks

  3. Session I: Electronic Auctions and Trading

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 29-29
    2. Monique Calisti, Boi Faltings, Sandro Mazziotta
      Pages 30-41
    3. Alistair Barros, Keith Duddy, Michael Lawley, Zoran Milosevic, Kerry Raymond, Andrew Wood
      Pages 54-66
  4. Session II: Internet-Based Service Markets

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 67-67
    2. Steve Rudkin, Alan Smith
      Pages 68-80
    3. Mohamed El-Darieby, Jerome Rolia
      Pages 81-92
  5. Session III: Quality of Service

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 105-105
    2. John Vicente, Michael Kounavis, Daniel Villela, Michah Lerner, Andrew Campbell
      Pages 106-123
    3. Rainer Hauck, Helmut Reiser
      Pages 124-137
    4. Monique Calisti, Boi Faltings
      Pages 138-149
  6. Session IV: Mobile and Distributed Services

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 151-151
    2. Volker Feil, Ulrich Gemkow, Matthias Stümpfle
      Pages 152-163
    3. Stefan Müller-Wilken, Winfried Lamersdorf
      Pages 164-175

About these proceedings

Introduction

USM 2000 is the third event in a series of international IFIP/GI conferences on Trends in Distributed Systems. Following the venues in Aachen, Germany (1996) and Hamburg, Germany (1998), this event in Munich considers the trend towards a Universal Service Market – USM 2000. The trend towards a universal service market has many origins, e.g., the integration of telecom and data communications, the deregulation e?orts with respect to telco markets, the globalization of information, the virtualization of companies, the requirement of a short time-to-market, the advances in network technologies, the increasing acceptance of e-commerce, and the increase in - bility. This leads to new business-to-business (B2B) and business-to-customer (B2C) environments that o?er both challenges and opportunities to enterprises and end-users. There is the need for ubiquitous services, trading, brokering and information management, for service market and business models, and for ?e- ble infrastructures for dynamic collaboration. Researchers, service vendors, and users must cooperate to set up the app- priate requirements for a universal service market and to ?nd solutions with respect to supporting platforms, middleware, distributed applications, and m- agement. The basis for these solution is a common understanding of means for de?ning, creating, implementing, and deploying the service market. Then, s- vice market makers, service aggregators, service auctioneers, ISP, ASP, BPO, and customers can freely interact in a dynamic, open, and universal market place.

Keywords

Data Communication Distributed Systems Electronic Commerce Internet Internet Services Middleware Mobile Data Access Quality of Service Quality of Service (QoS) Telecommunication Ubiquitous Services Universal Service Market Virtual Enterprises Web Infrastructure

Editors and affiliations

  • Claudia Linnhoff-Popien
    • 1
  • Heinz-Gerd Hegering
    • 2
  1. 1.Mobile and Distributed Systems Group, Institute for InformaticsLudwig-Maximilian UniversityMunichGermany
  2. 2.Institute for Computer ScienceLudwig-Maximilian University MunichMunichGermany

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/10722515
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000
  • Publisher Name Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-3-540-41024-9
  • Online ISBN 978-3-540-45272-0
  • Series Print ISSN 0302-9743
  • Series Online ISSN 1611-3349
  • About this book