Dynamics of Complex Interconnected Systems: Networks and Bioprocesses

  • Arne T. Skjeltorp
  • Alexander V. Belushkin
Part of the NATO Science Series II book series (NAII, volume 232)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages I-XV
  2. HUAFENG XIE, KOON-KIU YAN, SERGEI MASLOV
    Pages 29-37
  3. STÉPHANE SANTUCCI, KNUT JØRGEN MÅLØY, RENAUD TOUSSAINT, JEAN SCHMITTBUHL
    Pages 49-59
  4. JESPER FERKINGHOFF-BORG, MOGENS H. JENSEN, POUL OLESEN, JOACHIM MATHIESEN
    Pages 61-70
  5. EIVIND ALMAAS, ALBERT-LÁSZLÓ BARABÁSI
    Pages 107-125
  6. GAUTE T. EINEVOLL
    Pages 127-145
  7. K. de LANGE KRISTIANSEN, G. HELGESEN, A.T. SKJELTORP
    Pages 147-162
  8. THOMAS MØLLER HANSEN, NADER REIHANI, LENE ODDERSHEDE
    Pages 163-173
  9. JOSEPH L. MCCAULEY, GEMUNU H. GUNARATNE, KEVIN E. BASSLER
    Pages 191-202
  10. Back Matter
    Pages 211-211

About these proceedings

Introduction

This volume comprises the proceedings of a NATO Advanced Study Institute (ASI) held at Geilo, Norway, 11-21 April 2005, the eighteenth ASI in a series held every two years since 1971. The objective of this ASI was to identify and discuss areas where synergism between modern physics and biology may be most fruitfully applied to the study of bioprocesses for molecular recognition, and of networks for converting molecular reactions into usable signals and appropriate responses. Many fields of research are confronted with networks. Genetic and metabolic networks describe how proteins, substrates and genes interact in a cell; social networks quantify the interactions between people in the society; the Internet is a complex web of computers; ecological systems are best described as a web of species. In many cases, the interacting networks manifest so-called emergent properties that are not possessed by any of the individual components. This means that the detailed knowledge of the components is insufficient to describe the whole system. Recent work has indicated that networks in nature have so-called scale-free characteristics, and the associated dynamic network modelling shows unexpected results such as an amazing robustness against accidental failures, a property that is rooted in their inhomogeneous topology. Understanding these phenomena and turning them to use in chemical and biological threat detection and response will require exploring a wide range of network structures as well.

Keywords

Experiment Internet Statistical Physics cells computer mathematical modeling

Editors and affiliations

  • Arne T. Skjeltorp
    • 1
  • Alexander V. Belushkin
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Energy TechnologyKjellerNorway
  2. 2.Frank Laboratory of Neutron PhysicsDubnaRussia

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-5030-5
  • Copyright Information Springer 2006
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Physics and Astronomy
  • Print ISBN 978-1-4020-5028-2
  • Online ISBN 978-1-4020-5030-5
  • Series Print ISSN 1568-2609