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Concepts and Controversies in Tidal Marsh Ecology

  • Michael P. Weinstein
  • Daniel A. Kreeger

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvii
  2. Retrospective on the Salt Marsh Paradigm

  3. Sources and Patterns of Production

    1. Ivan Valiela, Marci L. Cole, James Mcclelland, Jennifer Hauxwell, Just Cebrian, Samantha B. Joye
      Pages 23-36
    2. Irving A. Mendelssohn, James T. Morris
      Pages 59-80
    3. Michael J. Sullivan, Carolyn A. Currin
      Pages 81-106
    4. Carles Ibñez, Antoni Curco, John W. Day Jr., Narcis Prat
      Pages 107-136
  4. Fate of Production within Marsh Food Webs

  5. Habitat Value: Food and/or Refuge

    1. Roger J. Zimmerman, Thomas J. Minello, Lawrence P. Rozas
      Pages 293-314
    2. J. M. Miller, W. H. Neill, K. A. Duchon, S. W. Ross
      Pages 315-331
    3. Linda A. Deegan, Jeffrey E. Hughes, Rodney A. Rountree
      Pages 333-365
  6. Biogeochemical Processes

    1. Richard F. Dame, Eric Koepfler, Leah Gregory
      Pages 369-390
    2. Daniel L. Childers, John W. Day Jr., Henry N. Mckellar Jr.
      Pages 391-423
    3. Jennifer Z. Merrill, Jeffrey C. Cornwell
      Pages 425-441
    4. Jelte Rozema, Peter Leendertse, Jan Bakker, Harm Van Wijnen
      Pages 469-491
  7. Modelling Nutrient and Energy Flux

  8. Tidal Marsh Restoration: Fact or Fiction?

    1. William J. Mitsch
      Pages 554-564
    2. Joy B. Zedler, Roberto Lindig-Cisneros
      Pages 565-582
    3. R. E. Turner, E. M. Swenson, C. S. Milan
      Pages 583-595
    4. Charles A. Simenstad, W. Gregory Hood, Ronald M. Thom, David A. Levy, Daniel L. Bottom
      Pages 597-630
  9. Ecological Engineering of Restored Marshes

  10. Measuring Function of Restored Tidal Marshes

    1. J. C. Stevenson, J.E. Rooth, K.L. Sundberg, M.S. Kearney
      Pages 709-735
    2. Stephen W. Broome, Christopher B. Craft, William A. Toomey Jr.
      Pages 737-747
    3. K. W. Able, D. M. Nemerson, P. R. Light, R. O. Bush
      Pages 749-773
  11. Success Criteria for Tidal Marsh Restoration

    1. Robert R. Christian, Laura E. Stasavich, Cassondra R. Thomas, Mark M. Brinson
      Pages 805-825
    2. Laura A. Meyerson, Kristiina A. Vogt, Randolph M. Chambers
      Pages 827-844
    3. Paul E. Fell, R. Scott Warren, William A. Niering
      Pages 845-858
  12. Back Matter
    Pages 859-875

About this book

Introduction

In 1968 when I forsook horticulture and plant physiology to try, with the help of Sea Grant funds, wetland ecology, it didn’t take long to discover a slim volume published in 1959 by the University of Georgia and edited by R. A. Ragotzkie, L. R. Pomeroy, J. M. Teal, and D. C. Scott, entitled “Proceedings of the Salt Marsh Conference” held in 1958 at the Marine Institute, Sapelo Island, Ga. Now forty years later, the Sapelo Island conference has been the major intellectual impetus, and another Sea Grant Program the major backer, of another symposium, the “International Symposium: Concepts and Controversies in Tidal Marsh Ecology”. This one re-examines the ideas of that first conference, ideas that stimulated four decades of research and led to major legislation in the United States to conserve coastal wetlands. It is dedicated, appropriately, to two then young scientists – Eugene P. Odum and John M. Teal – whose inspiration has been the starting place for a generation of coastal wetland and estuarine research. I do not mean to suggest that wetland research started at Sapelo Island. In 1899 H. C. Cowles described successional processes in Lake Michigan freshwater marsh ponds. There is a large and valuable early literature about northern bogs, most of it from Europe and the former USSR, although Eville Gorham and R. L. Lindeman made significant contributions to the American literature before 1960. V. J.

Keywords

Ecology Fauna Sediment algae benthic biogeochemical cycles ecosystem ecosystems environment fisheries macrophytes nutrient cycling vegetation wetland

Editors and affiliations

  • Michael P. Weinstein
    • 1
  • Daniel A. Kreeger
    • 2
  1. 1.New Jersey Marine Sciences ConsortiumFort HancockUSA
  2. 2.Academy of Natural SciencesPhiladelphiaUSA

Bibliographic information