Advertisement

Behavior and Social Issues

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 97–107 | Cite as

The Walden Fellowship Experiments

  • Mark A. MattainiEmail author
  • Janet S. Twyman
Article

Abstract

In this paper the authors report on the early development of a cultural entity—Walden Fellowship, Inc.— which was established “to explore and encourage the development of behavior and cultural practices which maximize reinforcement and minimize coercion over the long term for all persons in a manner consistent with the survival of the human and other species.” This voluntary organization maintains three primary streams of activity: self-education, consultation services, and cultural design research in the wider community. A major goal toward which involvement in all of these converge is the development of a mutually reinforcing social and verbal community among participants. Unlike an earlier paper in which this organization was conceptualized, this article is not fictional.

Key words

cultural design Walden Two 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ascher, M. L., & Turner, R. M. (1979). Paradoxical intention and insomnia: An experimental investigation. Behavioral Research and Therapy, 17, 408–411.  https://doi.org/10.1016/0005-7967(79)90015-9CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Biglan, A. (1995). Changing cultural practices: A contextualist framework for intervention research. Reno, NV: Context Press.Google Scholar
  3. Biglan, A. (1996). Male sexual coercion. In M. A. Mattaini, & B. A. Thyer (Eds.), Finding solutions to social problems: Behavioral strategies for change (pp. 289–316). Washington, DC: APA Books.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Briggs, H. E., & Paulson, R. I. (1996). Toward a behavioral analysis of racism. In M. A. Mattaini, & B. A. Thyer (Eds.), Finding solutions to social problems: Behavioral strategies for change (pp. 147–177). Washington, DC: APA Books.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Communidad Los Horcones. (1986). News from now-here, 1986: A response to, “News from nowhere, 1984.” The Behavior Analyst, 9, 129–132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Daly, P. H. (1996). Behavior analysis and women’s issues: Individual behavior and cultural practices. In M. A. Mattaini, & B. A. Thyer (Eds.), Finding solutions to social problems: Behavioral strategies for change (pp. 201–220). Washington, DC: APA Books.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Dumas, J. E., & Wahler, R. G. (1983). Predictors of treatment outcome in parent training: Mother insularity and socioeconomic disadvantage. Behavioral Assessment, 5, 301–313.Google Scholar
  8. Hayes, S. C, Jacobson, N. S., Follette, V. M., & Dougher, M. J. (1994). Acceptance and change: Content and context in psychotherapy. Reno, NV: Context Press.Google Scholar
  9. Kinkade, K. (1973). A Walden two experiment. New York: Quill.Google Scholar
  10. Kohlenberg, R. J., & Tsai, M. (1991). Functional analytic psychotherapy: Creating intense and curative therapeutic relationships. New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Lerner, G. (1986). The creation of patriarchy. New York: Oxford.Google Scholar
  12. Mattaini, M. A. (1991). Walden 1.9: Successive approximations. Behavior and Social Issues, 7(2), 53–60.Google Scholar
  13. Mattaini, M. A. (1995). Teaching cultural design: Shaping new behaviorists. Behavior and Social Issues, 5(2), 21–28.  https://doi.org/10.5210/bsi.v5i2.223Google Scholar
  14. Mattaini, M. A. & Twyman, J. S. (in press). Cultural design: Walden Fellowship task forces. Behavior and Social Issues.Google Scholar
  15. Mattaini, M. A., Twyman, J. S., Chin, W., & Lee, K. N. (1996). Youth violence. In M. A. Mattaini, & B. A. Thyer (Eds.), Finding solutions to social problems: Behavioral strategies for change (pp. 75–111). Washington, DC: APA Books.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Mattaini, M. A. & Williams, G (in press). Walden Fellowship behavioral workshops: Member self-education and community.building. Behavior and Social Issues.Google Scholar
  17. McDowell, J. J. (1988). Matching theory in natural human environments. The Behavior Analyst, 11, 95–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Ojeda, M. (in press). Services for homeless drug-abusing persons: Contingency management and community reinforcement. Behavior and Social Issues.Google Scholar
  19. Seidenfeld, M. & Mattaini, M. A. (in press). Personal and family consultation services: An alternative to therapy. Behavior and Social Issues.Google Scholar
  20. Sidman, M. (1989). Coercion and its fallout. Boston: Authors Cooperative.Google Scholar
  21. Skinner, B. F. (1948). Walden two. New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  22. Stuart, R. B. (1974). Teaching facts about drugs: Pushing or preventing? Journal of Educational Psychology, 66, 189–201.  https://doi.org/10.1037/h0036275CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Wahler, R. G. (1980). The insular mother: Her problems in parent-child treatment. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 8, 27–42.  https://doi.org/10.1901/jaba.1975.8-27CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Columbia University School of Social Work & Walden Fellowship, Inc.New YorkUSA
  2. 2.Fred S. Keller School & Walden Fellowship, Inc.USA

Personalised recommendations