Journal of the Korean Physical Society

, Volume 63, Issue 1, pp 28–35 | Cite as

Sensitivity analysis of a wide-field telescope

  • Juhee Lim
  • Sangon Lee
  • Il Kweon Moon
  • Ho-Soon Yang
  • Jong Ung Lee
  • Young-Jun Choi
  • Jang-Hyun Park
  • Ho Jin
Article

Abstract

We are developing three ground-based wide-field telescopes. A wide-field Cassegrain telescope consists of two hyperbolic mirrors, aberration correctors and a field flattener for a 2-degree field of view. The diameters of the primary mirror and the secondary mirror are 500 mm and 200 mm, respectively. Corrective optics combined with four lenses, a filter and a window are also considered. For the imaging detection device, we use a charge coupled device (CCD) which has a 4096 × 4096 array with a 9-µm2 pixel size. One of the requirements is that the image motion limit of the opto-mechanical structure be less than 1 pixel size of the CCD on the image plane. To meet this requirement, we carried out an optical design evaluation and a misalignment analysis. Line-of-sight sensitivity equations are obtained from the rigid-body rotation in three directions and the rigid-body translation in three directions. These equations express the image motions at the image plane in terms of the independent motions of the optical components. We conducted a response simulation to evaluate the finite element method models under static load conditions, and the result is represented by the static response function. We show that the wide-field telescope system is stiff and stable enough to be supported and operated during its operating time.

Keywords

Wide-field optics Optical design/analysis Finite element method Sensitivity equation 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Physical Society 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juhee Lim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sangon Lee
    • 2
    • 3
  • Il Kweon Moon
    • 2
  • Ho-Soon Yang
    • 2
  • Jong Ung Lee
    • 4
  • Young-Jun Choi
    • 5
  • Jang-Hyun Park
    • 5
  • Ho Jin
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Space ResearchKyung Hee UniversityYonginKorea
  2. 2.Korea Research Institute of Standards and ScienceDaejeonKorea
  3. 3.Department of Applied Optics and ElectromagneticsHannam UniversityDaejeonKorea
  4. 4.Department of Laser and Optical Information EngineeringCheongju UniversityDaejeonKorea
  5. 5.Korea Astronomy and Space Science InstituteDaejeonKorea

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