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Experimental study of cavitation phenomenon in a centrifugal blood pump induced by the failure of inlet cannula

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Abstract

Cavitation of centrifugal blood pump is a serious problem accompany with the blocking failure of short inlet cannula. However, hardly any work has been seen in published literature on this complex cavitation phenomenon caused by the coupling effect of inlet cannula blocking and pumps suction. Even for cavitation studies on ordinary centrifugal pumps, similar researches on this issue are rare. In this paper, the roles of throttling, rotation speed and fluid viscosity on bubble inception and intensity in a centrifugal blood pump are studied, on the basis of experimental observations. An adjustable throttle valve installed just upstream blood pump inlet is used to simulate the throttling effect of the narrowed inlet cannula. The rotation speed is adjusted from 2 600 r/min to 3 200 r/min. Glycerin water solutions are used to investigate the influences of kinetic viscosity. Bubbles are recorded with a high-speed video camera. Direct observation shows that different from cavitation in industrial centrifugal pumps, gas nuclei appears at the nearby of vane leading edges while throttling is light, then moves upstream to the joint position of inlet pipe and pump with the closing of the valve. It’s found that the critical inlet pressure, obtained when bubbles are first observed, decreases linearly with viscosity and the slope is independent with rotation speeds; the critical inlet pressure and the inlet extreme pressure which is obtained when the throttle valve is nearly closed, fall linearly with rotation speed respectively and the relative pressure between them is independent with rotation speed and fluid viscosity. This paper studies experimentally on cavitation in centrifugal blood pump that caused by the failure of assembled short inlet cannula, which may beneficial the design of centrifugal blood pump with inlet cannula.

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Author information

Correspondence to Xiaodong Ruan.

Additional information

This project is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51275461) and the Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. Z1110189)

LIN Zhe, born in 1987, is a PhD candidate at The State Key Lab of Fluid Power Transmission and Control, Zhejiang University, China. His research interests include fluid engineering and mechatronic engineering.

RUAN Xiaodong, born in 1967, is currently a professor at The State Key Lab of Fluid Power Transmission and Control, Zhejiang University, China. She received her PhD degree from Fukui University, Japan, in 2001. Her research interests include fluid control of complex flow, flow visualization, two-phase flow and fluid machinery.

ZOU Jun, born in 1977, is currently an associate professor at The State Key Lab of Fluid Power Transmission and Control, Zhejiang University, China. He received his PhD degree on mechatronics from Zhejiang University, China, in 2006. His research interests include micro fluidics, fluid cavitation and flow visualization.

FU Xin, born in 1961, is currently a professor at The State Key Lab of Fluid Power Transmission and Control, Zhejiang University, China. He received his PhD degree from Leoben University, Austria, in 1998. His research interests include micro fluidics, flow visualization and simulation, fluid cavitation and noise control, fluid detection and measurement.

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Lin, Z., Ruan, X., Zou, J. et al. Experimental study of cavitation phenomenon in a centrifugal blood pump induced by the failure of inlet cannula. Chin. J. Mech. Eng. 27, 165–170 (2014). https://doi.org/10.3901/CJME.2014.01.165

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Keywords

  • centrifugal blood pump
  • cavitation
  • viscosity
  • cannula diameter
  • rotation speed