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Behavior Research Methods

, Volume 46, Issue 3, pp 841–871 | Cite as

Norms on the gender perception of role nouns in Czech, English, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, and Slovak

  • Julia Misersky
  • Pascal M. Gygax
  • Paolo Canal
  • Ute Gabriel
  • Alan Garnham
  • Friederike Braun
  • Tania Chiarini
  • Kjellrun Englund
  • Adriana Hanulikova
  • Anton Öttl
  • Jana Valdrova
  • Lisa Von Stockhausen
  • Sabine Sczesny
Article

Abstract

We collected norms on the gender stereotypicality of an extensive list of role nouns in Czech, English, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, and Slovak, to be used as a basis for the selection of stimulus materials in future studies. We present a Web-based tool (available at https://www.unifr.ch/lcg/) that we developed to collect these norms and that we expect to be useful for other researchers, as well. In essence, we provide (a) gender stereotypicality norms across a number of languages and (b) a tool to facilitate cross-language as well as cross-cultural comparisons when researchers are interested in the investigation of the impact of stereotypicality on the processing of role nouns.

Keywords

Gender stereotypes Norms Role nouns Occupations Language 

Notes

Author note

The research reported in this article was funded by the European Community’s Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement nº 237907 (Marie Curie ITN, Language, Cognition, and Gender). We thank Maurizio Rigamonti for his invaluable help on setting up the questionnaire website.

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Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia Misersky
    • 1
  • Pascal M. Gygax
    • 1
  • Paolo Canal
    • 2
  • Ute Gabriel
    • 3
  • Alan Garnham
    • 2
  • Friederike Braun
    • 4
  • Tania Chiarini
    • 5
  • Kjellrun Englund
    • 3
  • Adriana Hanulikova
    • 6
  • Anton Öttl
    • 3
  • Jana Valdrova
    • 5
  • Lisa Von Stockhausen
    • 7
  • Sabine Sczesny
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of FribourgFribourgSwitzerland
  2. 2.University of SussexBrightonUK
  3. 3.Norwegian University of Science and TechnologyTrondheimNorway
  4. 4.University of KielKielGermany
  5. 5.University of BudweisBudweisCzech Republic
  6. 6.University of FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  7. 7.University of Duisburg-EssenDuisburg-EssenGermany
  8. 8.University of BernBernSwitzerland

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