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Psychonomic Bulletin & Review

, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 498–513 | Cite as

The effect of the position of atypical character-to-sound correspondences on reading kanji words aloud: Evidence for a sublexical serially operating kanji reading process

  • Ami Sambai
  • Max Coltheart
  • Akira Uno
Theoretical Review
  • 94 Downloads

Abstract

In English, the size of the regularity effect on word reading-aloud latency decreases across position of irregularity. This has been explained by a sublexical serially operating reading mechanism. It is unclear whether sublexical serial processing occurs in reading two-character kanji words aloud. To investigate this issue, we studied how the position of atypical character-to-sound correspondences influenced reading performance. When participants read inconsistent-atypical words aloud mixed randomly with nonwords, reading latencies of words with an inconsistent-atypical correspondence in the initial position were significantly longer than words with an inconsistent-atypical correspondence in the second position. The significant difference of reading latencies for inconsistent-atypical words disappeared when inconsistent-atypical words were presented without nonwords. Moreover, reading latencies for words with an inconsistent-atypical correspondence in the first position were shorter than for words with a typical correspondence in the first position. This typicality effect was absent when the atypicality was in the second position. These position-of-atypicality effects suggest that sublexical processing of kanji occurs serially and that the phonology of two-character kanji words is generated from both a lexical parallel process and a sublexical serial process.

Keywords

Sublexical serial processing Kanji reading Position of atypicality effect 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 15K17420.

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Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Osaka Kyoiku UniversityOsakaJapan
  2. 2.LD/Dyslexia CentreChibaJapan
  3. 3.Macquarie UniversitySydneyAustralia
  4. 4.University of TsukubaIbarakiJapan

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