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Psychonomic Bulletin & Review

, Volume 16, Issue 1, pp 150–155 | Cite as

Object permanence in dogs: Invisible displacement in a rotation task

  • Holly C. Miller
  • Cassie D. Gipson
  • Aubrey Vaughan
  • Rebecca Rayburn-Reeves
  • Thomas R. Zentall
Brief Reports

Abstract

Dogs were tested for object permanence using an invisible displacement in which an object was hidden in one of two containers at either end of a beam and the beam was rotated. Consistent with earlier research, when the beam was rotated 180°, the dogs failed to find the object. However, when the beam was rotated only 90°, they were successful. Furthermore, when the dogs were led either 90° or 180° around the apparatus, they were also successful. In a control condition, when the dogs could not see the direction of the 90° rotation, they failed to find the object. The results suggest that the 180° rotation may produce an interfering context that can be reduced by rotating the apparatus only 90° or by changing the dogs’ perspective. Once the conflict is eliminated, dogs show evidence of object permanence that includes invisibly displaced objects.

Keywords

Object Permanence Invisible Displacement Visible Displacement Displacement Device False Bottom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Holly C. Miller
    • 1
  • Cassie D. Gipson
    • 1
  • Aubrey Vaughan
    • 1
  • Rebecca Rayburn-Reeves
    • 1
  • Thomas R. Zentall
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of KentuckyLexington

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