Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience

, Volume 1, Issue 4, pp 394–410 | Cite as

Temporal order and processing acuity of visual, auditory, and tactile perception in developmentally dyslexic young adults

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Abstract

We studied the temporal acuity of 16 developmentally dyslexic young adults in three perceptual modalities. The control group consisted of 16 age- and IQ-matched normal readers. Two methods were used. In the temporal order judgment (TOJ) method, the stimuli were spatially separate fingertip indentations in the tactile system, tone bursts of different pitches in audition, and light flashes in vision. Participants indicated which one of two stimuli appeared first. To test temporal processing acuity (TPA), the same 8-msec nonspeech stimuli were presented as two parallel sequences of three stimulus pulses. Participants indicated, without order judgments, whether the pulses of the two sequences were simultaneous or nonsimultaneous. The dyslexic readers were somewhat inferior to the normal readers in all six temporal acuity tasks on average. Thus, our results agreed with the existence of a pansensory temporal processing deficit associated with dyslexia in a language with shallow orthography (Finnish) and in well-educated adults. The dyslexic and normal readers' temporal acuities overlapped so much, however, that acuity deficits alone would not allow dyslexia diagnoses. It was irrelevant whether or not the acuity task required order judgments. The groups did not differ in the nontemporal aspects of our experiments. Correlations between temporal acuity and reading-related tasks suggested that temporal acuity is associated with phonological awareness.

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Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marja Laasonen
    • 1
  • Elisabet Service
    • 1
  • Vei Jo Virsu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology00014 University of HelsinkiFinland

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