Body movements during sleep as a predictor of stage change

Abstract

The number of body movements during the 10-min period of Stage 2 just preceding and following SWS and REM sleep were counted in 10 males for 9 to 11 nights each. There was a significantly greater number of 10-min periods of Stage 2 without movement before SWS than after SWS, before REM sleep, and after REM sleep. The last movements in Stage 2 preceding SWS occurred, in most instances, at least 5 min or more before this transition. These data suggest that body movement in Stage 2 may delay the transition from this stage to SWS.

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Correspondence to L. C. Johnson.

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This study was supported in part by the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, the Department of the Navy. Dr. A. Muzet was a NATO fellow and is now at Centre d’Etudes Bioclimatiques du C.N.R.S., Strasbourg, France. The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private ones of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as necessarily reflecting the views of the Department of the Navy. The authors thank M. Austin, R. Hilbert, D. Rhinehart, D. Irwin, and J. Yale for their careful data collection.

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Muzet, A., Naitoh, P., Townsend, R.E. et al. Body movements during sleep as a predictor of stage change. Psychon Sci 29, 7–10 (1972). https://doi.org/10.3758/BF03336549

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Keywords

  • Sleep Stage
  • NREM Sleep
  • Clinical Neurophysiology
  • Impulsive Noise
  • Sleep Record