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Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society

, Volume 27, Issue 6, pp 545–547 | Cite as

Recall mode and recency in immediate serial recall: Computer users beware!

  • Catherine G. Penney
  • Penny Ann Blackwood
Article
  • 158 Downloads

Abstract

Two experiments were carried out in which subjects were tested on immediate serial recall of digit lists. In both experiments, some subjects wrote their responses on paper, and other subjects entered their responses by means of a computer keyboard. In both experiments, keyboard entry of responses resulted in lower recall of items from the recency part of the serial-position curve, and in the second experiment, the difference between the two response modes was greater when lists had been presented visually rather than auditorily. The auditory suffix effect was not diminished by keyboard entry of responses. Investigators of recency effects in serial recall are cautioned about using keyboard entry of responses.

Keywords

Serial Position List Item Serial Recall Computer Keyboard List Modality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine G. Penney
    • 1
  • Penny Ann Blackwood
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentMemorial University of NewfoundlandSt John’sCanada

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