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Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society

, Volume 27, Issue 3, pp 280–281 | Cite as

Male-female estimates of opposite-sex first impressions concerning females’ clothing styles

  • Delwin D. Cahoon
  • Ed M. Edmonds
Article

Abstract

Men and women college students recorded their impressions of a model dressed either conservatively or in clothing judged to be sexually provocative, and also attempted to estimate the impressions of a typical member of the opposite sex. The results indicated a generally negative bias toward women wearing provocative clothing. The most striking finding was that females greatly overestimated the extent of male rape motivation.

Keywords

Sexual Interest Typical Member Clothing Style Augusta College Clothes Condition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© The Psychonomic Society, Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Delwin D. Cahoon
    • 1
  • Ed M. Edmonds
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyAugusta CollegeAugusta

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