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Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 371–373 | Cite as

On the ability to inhibit complex thoughts: A stop-signal study of arithmetic

  • Gordon D. Logan
  • Carol Y. Barber
Article

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to determine whether the stop-signal procedure of Logan (1983, 1985) is sensitive enough to detect the presence of inhibited thoughts when thoughts are in fact inhibited, and to determine whether the stop-signal procedure is susceptible to Zeigarnik-type effects. Subjects added several columns of nine digits and were interrupted occasionally. A subsequent recognition memory test showed that interrupted problems were remembered less accurately than completed problems and that memory for interrupted problems was worse the earlier the interruption occurred. These results suggest that the stop-signal procedure is sensitive enough to detect thoughts that actually were inhibited and that the stop-signal paradigm is not susceptible to Zeigarnik-type effects even when it is applied to complex tasks.

Keywords

Word Pair Stop Signal Repetition Priming Signal Trial Inhibited Thought 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© The psychonomic Society, Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gordon D. Logan
    • 1
  • Carol Y. Barber
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychological SciencesPurdue UniversityWest Lafayette
  2. 2.University of GuelphGuelphCanada

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