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Psychonomic Science

, Volume 27, Issue 3, pp 151–152 | Cite as

The role of anterior ganglia in phototaxis and thigmotaxis in the earthworm

  • John H. Doolittle
Brain Lesion
  • 248 Downloads

Abstract

The role of the supra- and subpharyngeal (anterior) ganglia in thigmotaxic and phototaxic behavior in the earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) was studied. In the first experiment, thigmotaxis reduced negative phototaxis for both worms whose anterior ganglia were removed and control worms. Therefore, the thigmotaxic effect appeared independent of the anterior ganglia. In the second experiment, the role of the anterior ganglia in the accuracy of escape from a directional light was studied. Earthworms with intact anterior ganglia did not escape the light significantly more accurately than earthworms without anterior ganglia.

Keywords

Neural Basis Escape Response Removal Group Incandescent Light Control Worm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© The Psychonomic Society, Inc. 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • John H. Doolittle
    • 1
  1. 1.Sacramento State CollegeSacramentoUSA

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