Minicomputers

Abstract

The characteristics and costs of minicomputers are discussed along with peripherals, time-sharing, and turnkey systems. The article concludes with a survey of over 100 small computer systems.

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Sidowski, J.B. Minicomputers. Behav. Res. Meth. & Instru. 2, 267–288 (1970). https://doi.org/10.3758/BF03211027

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Keywords

  • Word Length
  • Central Processor
  • Direct Memory Access
  • Digital Equipment Corporation
  • Core Memory