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Taxisin Aplysia dactylomela (Rang, 1828) to water-borne stimuli from conspecifics

Abstract

Sixteen reproductively matureAplysia dactylomela were observed in a unidirectional stream under each of four conditions: sea water only, one sea hare, six sea hares, and a copulating sea hare pair. Streams containing conspecific stimulation were significantly more effective in eliciting a positive taxis towards the stimulus source. A copulating pair was not different from one or six animals in producing the approach. The sea hares showed a distinct final head orientation to six sea hares when compared with sea water only; final orientation did not differ in any other comparison.

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The research was supported by the Department of Animal Behavior of The American Museum of Natural History, the Research Foundation of The City University of New York, Training Grant MH-13051 and NIMH Grant No. 1R03-MH24275-0.

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Lederhendler, I.I., Herriges, K. & Tobach, E. Taxisin Aplysia dactylomela (Rang, 1828) to water-borne stimuli from conspecifics. Animal Learning & Behavior 5, 355–358 (1977). https://doi.org/10.3758/BF03209578

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Keywords

  • Head Orientation
  • Behavioral Biology
  • Final Orientation
  • Stimulus Source
  • Food Stimulation