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Some referents and measures of nonverbal behavior

Abstract

This paper summarizes some of the measures of nonverbal behavior that have been found to be significant indicators of a communicator’s attitude toward, status relative to, and responsiveness to his addressee. The nonverbal cues considered include posture, position, movement, facial, and implicit verbal cues. In addition to providing criteria for the scoring of these cues, experimental findings that relate to the various cues are summarized.

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This study was supported by United States Public Health Service Grant MH 13509.

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Mehrabian, A. Some referents and measures of nonverbal behavior. Behav. Res. Meth. & Instru. 1, 203–207 (1968). https://doi.org/10.3758/BF03208096

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.3758/BF03208096

Keywords

  • Nonverbal Behavior
  • Body Orientation
  • Speech Disturbance
  • Speech Volume
  • Positive Head