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Micro Experimental Laboratory: An integrated system for IBM PC compatibles

Abstract

Micro Experimental Laboratory (MEL) is a third-generation integrated software system for experimental research. The researcher fills in forms, and MEL writes the experimental program, runs the experiments, and analyzes the data. MEL includes a form-based user interface, automatic programming, computer tutorials, a compiler, a real-time data acquisition system, database management, statistical analysis, and subject scheduling. It can perform most reaction time, questionnaire, and text comprehension experiments with little or no programming. It includes a Pascal-like programming language and can call routines written in standard languages. MEL operates on IBM PC compatible computers and supports most display controllers. MEL maintains millisecond timing with high-speed text and graphics presentation. MEL provides a systematic approach to dealing with nine concerns in running an experimental laboratory.

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For detailed descriptions of the Micro Experimental Laboratory software and demonstration floppies, contact Psychology Software Tools, Inc., 511 Bevington Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15221 (phone 412-244-1908). The cost of licensing the system varies, depending on features requested and quantity ordered. Single licenses are $295 for the student edition, $495 for the professional edition.

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Schneider, W. Micro Experimental Laboratory: An integrated system for IBM PC compatibles. Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers 20, 206–217 (1988). https://doi.org/10.3758/BF03203833

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.3758/BF03203833

Keywords

  • Behavior Research Method
  • Frame Form
  • Color Palette
  • Trial Form
  • Floppy Disk Drive