Advertisement

Behavior Research Methods & Instrumentation

, Volume 15, Issue 6, pp 561–568 | Cite as

The importance of inhalation volume when measuring smoking behavior

  • Ronald I. Herning
  • Johanna S. Hunt
  • Reese T. Jones
Methods & Designs
  • 564 Downloads

Abstract

Theoretical and technical considerations of measuring puff and inhalation volumes during cigarette smoking are reviewed. Measures of smoking behavior using a flowmeter and inductance plethysmography are described and demonstrated with seven subjects smoking over a 3-to 4-h period. Puff volume and duration, inhaled volume and duration, interpuff and intercigarette interval, and number of puffs varied for each individual over the session. The ratio of puff volume to inhaled volume changed with successive cigarettes. Smokers adjust the concentration of smoke by blending air with the smoke. Thus, to completely characterize smoking behavior, the volume of smoke and air inhaled into the lungs must be measured directly.

Keywords

Nicotine Smoke NASH Smoking Pattern Cigarette Brand 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Ashton, H., Stepney, R., &Thompson, J. W. Should intake of carbon monoxide be used as a guide to the intake of other smoke constituents?British Medical Journal, 1981,282, 10–13.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Baker, R. R. Contribution to draw resistance of a burning cigarette.Beetrage zur Tabakforschung, 1975,8, 124–131.Google Scholar
  3. Battig, K., Buzzi, R., &Nil, R. Smoke yield of cigarettes and puffing behavior in men and women.Psychopharmacology, 1982,76, 139–148.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Benner, J. F. Tentative summary of leaf and smoke analysis of the University of Kentucky reference and alkaloid cigarettes. In R. E. Griffith (Ed.),Proceedings of the tobacco and health conference. Lexington: University of Kentucky, 1970.Google Scholar
  5. Benowitz, N. L. The use of biologic fluid samples in assessing tobacco smoke consumption.National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Monograph, in press, 1983.Google Scholar
  6. Cohen, M. A., Watson, H., Weisshaut, R., Stott, F., &Sackner, M. A. A transducer for noninvasive monitoring of respiration. In F. D. Stott, E. B. Raftery, P. Sleight, & L. Goulding (Eds.),ISAM 1978: Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Ambulatory Monitoring. London: Academic Press, 1978.Google Scholar
  7. Comer, A. K., &Creighton, D. E. The effect of experimental conditions on smoking behaviour. In R. E. Thornton (Ed.),Smoking behaviour—Physiological and psychological influences. London: Churchill Livingstone, 1978.Google Scholar
  8. Creighton, D. E., &Lewis, P. H. The effect of different cigarettes on human smoking patterns. In R. E. Thornton (Ed.),Smoking behaviour—Physiological and psychological influences. London: Churchill Livingstone, 1978a.Google Scholar
  9. Creighton, D. E., &Lewis, P. H. The effect of smoking pattern on smoke deliveries. In R. E. Thornton (Ed.),Smoking behavior —Physiological and psychological influences. London: Churchill Livingstone, 1978b.Google Scholar
  10. Creighton, D. E., Noble, M. J., &Whewell, R. T. Instruments to measure, record and duplicate human smoking patterns. In R. E. Thornton (Ed.),Smoking behaviour—Physiological and psychological influences. London: Churchill Livingstone, 1978.Google Scholar
  11. Epstein, L. H., Ossip, D. J., Hughes, J., &Wiist, W. Measurement of smoking topography during withdrawal or deprivation.Behavior Therapy, 1982,12, 507–519.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Erlbacher, J., Gilbert, R., &Auchincloss, J. H. An impedance pneumograph utilizing an actively regulated constant current source.Journal of Applied Physiology, 1974,37, 961–967.Google Scholar
  13. Gritz, E. R., Rose, J. E., &Jarvik, M. E. Regulation of tobacco smoke with paced cigarette presentation.Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, 1983,18, 457–462.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Guillerm, R., &Radziszewski, E. A new method of analyzing the act of smoking.Annales du Tabac, 1975,1, 101–110.Google Scholar
  15. Guillerm, R., &Radziszewski, E. Analysis of smoking pattern including intake of carbon monoxide and influence of changes in cigarette design. In R. E. Thornton (Ed.),Smoking behavior —Physiological and psychological influences. London: Churchill Livingstone, 1978.Google Scholar
  16. Gust, S. W., &Pickens, R. W. Does nicotine yield affect puff volume?Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 1982,32, 418–422.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Henninofield, J. E., &Griffiths, R. R. A preparation for the experimental analysis of human cigarette smoking behavior.Behavior Research Methods & Experimentation, 1979,11, 538–544.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Herning, R. I., Jones, R. T., Bachman, J., &Mines, A. H. Puff volume increases when low nicotine cigarettes are smoked.British Medical Journal, 1981,283, 187–193.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Herning, R. I., Jones, R. T., Benowitz, N. L., &Mines, A. H. How a cigarette is smoked determines nicotine blood levels.Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 1982,33, 84–90.Google Scholar
  20. Milledge, J. S., &Stoll, F. D. Inductive plethysmography—A new respiratory transducer.Journal of Physiology, 1977,267, 18.Google Scholar
  21. Nash, J. C.Compact numerical methods for computers. New York: Wiley-Halsted, 1979.Google Scholar
  22. Rawbone, R. G., Murphy, K., Tate, M. E., &Kane, S. J. The analysis of smoking parameters, inhalation and absorption of tobacco smoke in studies of human smoking behaviour. In R. E. Thornton (Ed.),Smoking behaviour—Physiological and psychological influences. London: Churchill Livingstone, 1978.Google Scholar
  23. Schievelbein, H. Nicotine, resorption and fate.Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 1982,18, 233–247.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. Shapiro, A., &Cohen, H. D. The use of mercury capillary length gauges for the measurement of the volume of thoracic and diaphragmatic components of human respiration: A theoretical analysis and a practical method.Transactions of the New York Academy of Science, 1965,27, 634–649.Google Scholar
  25. Sheahon, N. F., Pavia, D., Bateman, J. R. M., Agnew, J. E., &Clark, S. W. Objectivein vivo analysis of antismoking cigarette filters.Thorax, 1981,36, 213–216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Stagg, D., Goldman, M., &Davis, J. H. Computer aided measurement of breath volume and time components using magnetometers.Journal of Applied Physiology, 1978,44, 623–631.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  27. Tobin, M. J., &Sackner, M. A. Monitoring smoking patterns of low and high tar cigarettes with inductive plethysmography.Annual Reviews of Respiratory Disease, 1982,126, 258–264.Google Scholar
  28. Watson, H. The technology of inductive plethysmography. In F. D. Stott, B. Raftery, L. Goulding (Eds.),ISAM 1979: Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Ambulatory Monitoring. London: Academic Press, 1980.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald I. Herning
    • 1
  • Johanna S. Hunt
    • 1
  • Reese T. Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Langley Porter Psychiatric InstituteUniversity of CaliforniaSan Francisco

Personalised recommendations