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Memory of self-performed tasks: Self-performing during recognition

Abstract

Two experiments focused on whether performing actions described by to-be-remembered phrases during recognition enhances recognition compared with results of a standard verbal recognition test. The enhancement was predicted when the actions described by the phrases had been performed during study, but not when the phrases were verbally encoded by simply listening to and memorizing the material. Both experiments showed that enactment prior to recognition improved memory performance, but only when subjects had encoded by enactment. Experiment 1 also demonstrated that this test-procedure effect was independent of a bizarreness effect, which was observed only with the verbal encoding task. Experiment 2 showed that the effect of enactment during recognition was reduced when subjects used different hands for performing the actions during study and recognition- The findings support the assumption that some kind of motor memory record underlies the enactment effect that occurs when actions are performed during recognition.

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Correspondence to Johannes Engelkamp.

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This research was supported by Grant EN 12418 from the German Science Foundation (DFG) to J E and HZ

—Accepted bt previous editor, Margaret Jean Intones-Peterson

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Engelkamp, J., Zimmer, H.D., Mohr, G. et al. Memory of self-performed tasks: Self-performing during recognition. Mem Cogn 22, 34–39 (1994). https://doi.org/10.3758/BF03202759

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.3758/BF03202759

Keywords

  • False Alarm
  • Test List
  • Verbal Task
  • Motor Information
  • Bizarreness Effect