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An improved respiratory system for curarized rats

  • Claude J. Gaebelein
  • James L. Howard
Instrumentation & Techniques

Abstract

A respiratory system is described in which peak expired CO2 is continuously monitored from curarized rats. Another alteration from previous systems is that an endotracheal tube is used to minimize dead air space. The adequacy of the system was tested by maintaining curarized rats at one level of peak expired CO2 for varying periods of time and by keeping rats at different peak expired CO2 levels for a fixed period of time. Results of blood gas analyses indicated that values obtained with this system are similar to values in noncurarized rats, and that manipulation of expired CO2 is an effective means of altering blood gas values.

Keywords

Respiratory System Behavior Research Method Tongue Depressor Succinylcholine Chloride Psychophysiological Research 
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References

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Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claude J. Gaebelein
    • 1
  • James L. Howard
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and the Biological Sciences Research Center of the Child Development InstituteUniversity of North CarolinaChapel Hill

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