Memory & Cognition

, Volume 14, Issue 5, pp 371–381 | Cite as

Aging and memory for faces versus single views of faces

  • James C. Bartlett
  • Jo E. Leslie
Article
  • 659 Downloads

Abstract

Differences in the ability of young adults and elderly to recognize faces were examined under two conditions. In a standard single-view condition, in which each input face was shown as one photograph, we confirmed prior findings that young adults perform better than the elderly at distinguishing photographs seen before from photographs of new faces. We also found that the elderly had more trouble distinguishing photographs seen before from photographs of(l) old faces changed in facial expression and (2) old faces changed in expression and pose. Yet there were no reliable age differences in distinguishing old-but-changed faces from entirely new faces. In a more naturalistic multi-view condition, in which each input face was shown in four poses and with two expressions, no age differences were found. A second experiment ruled out the possibility that varied repetition, by itself, removes age differences in recognizing faces. These data supported age differences in remembering facial expressions and possibly other details of photographs of faces, but not in remembering faces perse.

Keywords

Facial Expression Face Recognition Elderly Subject Item Type Varied Repetition 

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Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • James C. Bartlett
    • 1
  • Jo E. Leslie
    • 1
  1. 1.Programs in Psychology and Human DevelopmentThe University of Texas at DallasRichardson

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