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When and why is ease of retrieval informative?

Abstract

In two experiments, we examined when and why ease of retrieval of information from memory affects behavioral frequency and attitudinal judgments. Overall, the results suggest that when the subjective experience of ease of retrieval is consistent with the expected ease of retrieval, the content of the information retrieved is used to make judgments. However, when there is a discrepancy between experienced and expected ease of retrieval, the subjective experience of ease of retrieval is used to make judgments. Ease of retrieval is more informative when the discrepancy between experienced and expected ease of retrieval cannot be attributed to task contingencies; when it can, ease of retrieval ceases to be informative.

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Correspondence to Priya Raghubir.

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G.M. is Professor of Marketing and Harold MacDowell Faculty Fellow at the Leonard N. Stern School of Business, New York University. The authors contributed equally to the development of this article.

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Raghubir, P., Menon, G. When and why is ease of retrieval informative?. Memory & Cognition 33, 821–832 (2005). https://doi.org/10.3758/BF03193077

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.3758/BF03193077

Keywords

  • Behavioral Intention
  • Positive Experience
  • Consumer Research
  • Recall Task
  • Listing Task