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Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics

, Volume 71, Issue 7, pp 1487–1494 | Cite as

Is attention confined to one word at a time? The spatial distribution of parafoveal preview benefits during reading

  • Chin-An Wang
  • Albrecht W. InhoffEmail author
  • Ralph Radach
Research Articles
  • 704 Downloads

Abstract

Eye movements were recorded while participants read declarative sentences. Each sentence contained a critical three-word sequence with a three-letter target word (n), a spatially adjacent post-target word (n+1), and a subsequent nonadjacent post-target word (n+2). The parafoveal previews of words n and n+2 were manipulated so that they were either fully visible or masked until they were fixated. The results revealed longer word n and word n+1 viewing durations when word n had been masked in the parafovea, and this occurred irrespective of whether the target was skipped or fixated. Furthermore, masking of word n diminished the usefulness of the preview of word n+2. These results indicate that the effect of a parafoveally available target preview was not strictly localized. Instead, it influenced target viewing and the viewing of the two subsequent words in the text. These results are difficult to reconcile with the assumption that attention is confined to one word at a time until that word is recognized and that attention is then shifted from the recognized word to the next.

Keywords

Target Word Critical Word Lexical Processing Preview Benefit Parafoveal Preview 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chin-An Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Albrecht W. Inhoff
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ralph Radach
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyBinghamton UniversityBinghamton
  2. 2.National Yang-Ming UniversityTapeiTaiwan
  3. 3.Florida State UniversityTallahassee

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